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Best of Bryce Lane

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Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 3:58 pm

Table of Contents

Rules for Strength

Nothing new under the sun?

The Great Pyramid

The Joy of Suffering

Have it all!

The Ultimate Brute-Force Real World He-Man Power Program?

Double Trouble

Around the world in 12 working days!

Wall-only circuits: '1011'

The Wheel of Doom

Bryce on Side Presses

Bryce on Get Ups

Bryce on Wrestling Training

About Power

Fast Iron


"Rules for Strength:"
1.) your marker of progress long term, must be lifting more (it's surprising how often this is ignored).

2.) If you are doing it and it is not helping you lift more, stop doing it. Do something else and repeat this process at reasonable intervals until you are lifting more.

3.) Compete at things that involve the type of strength you want to increase. It's amazing how much nonsense this eliminates.

4.) If you win, be in the gym the next day working on lifting more next time. If you lose, be in the gym the next day working on how you are going to lift more next time.

5.) If you think you are going to get super strong by next week, slam your head against something iron, until this delusion disappears, then sober-up and start working on how you are going to lift more.

6.) Become comfortable with the fact that 75% of what you will do in this quest will fail and be a waste of time. pay close attention so you can find the 25% that isn't.

7.) Getting stronger, and proving a point about what is the only "right" way to get stronger, are incompatible goals.

8.) Don't get greedy. Time is your friend, unless you try to steal from him too much.

9.) If you miss a lift(s) or are burned out, correct the problem, don't just stand around hatin' yourself. Hate doesn't move anything. Bars and plates don't respond to four letter words, they move when acted on by a greater force.

Become the greater force.
Bryce
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'Nothing New'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:03 pm

Nothing new under the sun?
I hear this all the time and its true for what it is meant...sort of. There is no "thing" new under the sun. But what this phrase does is point out a huge human blind spot that has caused us humans allot of trouble. The way it all operates is not with "things" but relationships between them and there is lots new under the sun there. Maybe there are only so many "things" but when you start counting the ways you can arrange those things creatively to your advantage, you just run out of numbers and give up. In weightlifting this is especially the case. It all really has been done if you count things like bending knees and elbows, can't miss. However the ways programs can be put together so that what you are doing is complimentary rather than antagonistic to your purpose, that is where the action really is. Most writing you read in this field is about recipes, to get the right results you need the right ingredients, but the trouble comes when there is so much emphasis on the ingredients, we forget how to make a cake. The cake is all about the relationships between the ingredients, not just dumping stuff in a bowl and shoving it in the oven. If this is the way you make a cake, don't invite me to any of your dinner parties. Not only this but in any of these recipes you have one ingredient that you never really know how well it will get along with the other ingredients at any particular time or under any certain circumstances. That ingredient is you and there is a whole new world under the sun there. Let’s say you have been at all of this a year. You've worked with doing ye-olde twenty rep squat, DL and press. An old and venerable program, very reliable, but progress while pretty good at first has stopped. You know it’s a good routine, all the ingredients for success are there but still you are stale, starting to dislike workouts and afraid you are heading backwards. Most people at this point start blaming themselves rather than think about getting out the wrench and working on what is obviously now not working. The ingredients may all be good but perhaps the trouble is in the mix. When you mix two things together, you get a whole new thing which may or may not be like its parts. Aside from hundreds of exercises there are quite a few ways to work on strength or endurance:
1.) Work on adding resistance.
2.) Work towards adding repetitions.
3.) Work on doing more in less time.
4.) Work on doing more work in a limited time.
5.) Practice the motion of the lift till you get sharp and quick at it (GTG or "neuromuscular facilitation")
6.) Assistance exercises to help the lift you have in mind.
7.) Working on weak areas in the rack, or with chains or bands.
8.) Working on endurance to aid strength.
9.) Working up your strength to aid your endurance.
10.) Changing the tempo or speed of the lift (high pulls vs. DLs for example).
There are probably more but this is what I could think of at the moment. There is one bigger set, bigger than all of the above put together exponentially and different perhaps than the effects of any of its components. That set is "some combination of any of the above". That which is well put together is more than the sum of its parts. A good painting is more than just the colors of paint you use. One definition of a good mechanic is "knows how to use his tools to solve problems". This is a good definition for a weightlifter, sportsman or coach also. Winning or improving is all about solving problems. If you solve yours better than he solves his....you most often win (aside from dumb luck). An example of how this can go bad is the "if some of one thing is good, then lots of it must be even better". This is alot like saying "if a pinch of salt on this catfish is good, then the whole canister of Morton's must be even better. You see this all the time in programs that have all of one set or rep scheme for every exercise whether it is good for who is doing it or not. Doing three sets of twelve may be great to give you progress in one exercise, but a whole program of it might stale quicker than leaving your beer in the Texas summer sun. An example of how keeping your thinking open on this can be seeing that much of your program isn't producing progress; However you have slow progress still on the squats but all the others are stopped dead. You change to one or more other modes from above along with some exercise changes that fit in after some critical thinking. Now after a couple of weeks that it is all running along well as a whole now adjustments were made with the whole in mind. Instead of doing 20rep sqs, and 12 reps on everything else, you are doing 50reps of squats with a lighter weight and a five minute limit. Doing presses from eye level in the rack (weak point) and doing heavy db swings for eight sets of heavy doubles instead of the SLDLs you were doing which combined with the heavy squats trashed you out. Also just as a minor matter, you reversed your grip on the chins and made the reps faster. Not just some progress here or there, but the whole picture looks good. This is what you want, not just good ingredients but a good cake. You keep making little "tweaks" as you go along spotting problems and possibilities for improvement honing your recipe to county fair perfection. Each of these decisions was made to work with a particular problem and improve the whole. All adjusted to work with all else to produce a better sum than that of just the components. You have started looking at the relationships between the things you are doing, not just the things themselves. If you can't squat and DL at the same time there are alternatives that will fit in better for you. If your chins go stale with benching on the same day then sometimes a little adjustment gets it all started again etc. Maybe you need to keep one thing the same and change
the others, and maybe you want to keep most the same but change one "problem child" so it fits in better. The important thing is to have a sense of proportion and not over-react by jumping from one opposite philosophy to another and becoming a "Iron-game vagrant". Don’t hate wrenches and love hammers or the other way around, pay attention and learn how to use either tool for the right job along with the others. The right tools working together is worth far more than any one of them in particular. "Less isn't more"; Less is less, more is more, enough is enough and dead-on-right is even better. Most really successful workouts you see people using are not based on one philosophy or another but some personal mix of modes and solutions which varies with time as new problems and possibilities are found. "How do I do this" is the question now? The answer is "I dunno", that's the thing. You gotta get in the kitchen and make enough bad cakes to know all about making a good one. You gotta listen to the success and disaster stories of other cooks critically and just keep going in the direction you have chosen. Jerry Spence the famous attorney says essentially that the only way to become a good attorney is to be a bad one and 'pile up bodies' long enough to improve". However I will add to what Jerry said, in that this only works if you are paying attention and have an open mind. If you have a narrow philosophy of all of this and are being strangled by it, you will likely never improve. Every workout or cycle you create for yourself or other people is the paint that will determine the big picture at some point in the future. This is the territory of craftsmen, explorers and artists who take pride in their work and enjoy being creative, making adjustments, solving problems. Today’s world is full of "de-skilling" or "dumbing down" of every job or occupation known to man. They try to do it all by formula so individuals are replaceable and cheep, don't sell yourself or the people you are helping short by going with this. The thing that really separates us from the animals is that we can make something other of ourselves than we are today or were yesterday. If you give this sort of creativity up for formulas...what or who are you? This short article is not to depress you about the "long road ahead" but to show that there really can be allot new under the sun if you want to learn how to make it so. The secret to lots of activities is not to get blinded by looking at the "things" or ingredients but to work on understanding and using the relationships between them, and that is "the cake". When anyone tells you "it’s all been done" you know you are talking to someone who has a real small idea of what "it all" might be, blow em' off you got more and better to do.....if you work on learning to see it.
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'The Great Pyramid'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:06 pm

The Great Pyramid
By Bryce Lane 2004

In most things we do we consider that whatever it is we want there is simply more or less of it. You are either moving one way along the line, the other way, or staying put. However often the way you think about something, the way you model it in your head is everything. Simply asking a question well can give you the answer you want. Consider three kinds of strength:

1.) Continuous effort--Strength repeated continuously a lift or motion done for 10-15 min perhaps.
2.) Recoverable effort--Strength exerted intermittently in periods of high effort and recovery.
3.) One time effort--Done once with no likelihood of repeating in a reasonable time.

Let’s consider that you want to be as one time strong as possible. That puts #3 at the top, #1 at the bottom and #2 across the middle. Much of this is probably not new to you at this point in fact you might be saying "duh"; However let’s consider also a couple of variables, the first is the height of the point from its base and the second is the width of the base. Some of us have naturally or through some training very steep pyramids that come from a small base up to a steep point and other the opposite. I suspect that knowing this and how to work these two relations (the ratio between them) with each other is the real basis of any physical quality you wish to get more of.

Let’s take an athlete who had a 500# deadlift, and no matter how hard he trains he can't seem to exceed this point. Upon having an epiphany one day and half out of frustration he decides to do a longer set of 20 and discovers that the weight has to drop a very long way before he can do that. He discovers in his case that the triangle is very steep; the ratio of height to width is too high. So over the next few weeks he works on these 20 rep sets (yes plural now) and finds pretty rapid improvement. Pleased with this he continues until a point of diminishing returns when the numbers are not going up anymore in the 20's. He decides to go back to the singles and at first there is no difference but over a few more weeks what was 500# creeps up to 510# and then 525# and not only that but he can do more than that one big single and further that some of that dizziness he got on the top single is gone. Deciding this to be successful he decides to go even lower on the triangle and build up some endurance at the very base with hyper-extensions, swings and cleans for much more than 20 reps. After this he goes back to the twenties and then up to the singles again and same thing, but even somewhat better this time. Upon drawing this out on paper this lifter sees that when his triangle gets steep enough, progress stops yet when it widens out a bit, given time, progress returns. Upon looking at his training log it seems like if he spends 20% of his time at the baseline, 20% in the middle and 60% at the top (just examples) then progress continues and not only that but he feels better and has seen his own feet over his gut for the first time in years.

For any other of the three you can simply rotate the triangle with what you want on top. For example if you are after extreme endurance have #1 on top, #2 in the middle and #3 on the bottom. If you are after truck loading kind of work capacity then put #2 on top, and #3 or #1 on the bottom or middle depending on how heavy those boxes really are, but you get the point. If progress stops on your peak item then go down to the bottom, give it some time and work your way back up till the triangle proportions are conducive to progress again. I think everyone for many reasons has a steepness in this shape that suits them and if you don't' recognize it and work with it, you get stuck. There is some mix of these three kinds of work that will make your particular triangle go up the quickest in the long term. It’s one thing to understand this and many people do, but it’s another to have the patience and foresight to figure out your particular numbers and put them into practice long term.
All the good recipes I know of are not all about more or less of one single ingredient but the just-right proportion of all of them and then cooked patiently for just the right amount of time.


Last edited by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
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'The Joy of Suffering'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:07 pm

The Joy of Suffering
The more you suffer, the more you deserve to gain and the more you get; right? No, in
fact its darn stupid and can ruin you workouts and your life. “Noble suffering” is so
ingrained in our culture and the way we think about things its near impossible to
distinguish who we view as hero's from who we view as victims, especially of
themselves.
What does this have to do with weightlifting? The answer is easy. How often do you hear
people talking about the pain and misery of their workouts or of some guy's workout that
makes the whole thing seem more like a mean S&M session than anything any rational
person might ever want to do? Its as if most people think there are old-testament strength
gods that must be appeased in blood sacrifice in the rack to bestow us mercifully with
results. I think this is as “bass-akwards” as anything can be.
Well, there ain't no strength gods folks, we are alone in this big gym and we gotta either
solve our own problems or work together to find our own ways or we are lost and all the
blood and sacrifice in the world ain't gonna help. If the car breaks down, your mechanic
can fix it a lot faster than banging your head bloody on the hood and praying to the
goddess of multi-point fuel injection for mercy.
I've seen lots of people simply kill themselves indiscriminately and without thought in
everything from business, or artwork to the weights and either move painfully slowly or
get nowhere at all at some point or for years. So, what do they do; They try harder, they
figure with more blood on the bar they will “deserve” more strength, flexibility,
endurance or whatever they want. The strength deities will see and reward the sacrifice of
this desperate worshiper and reward him with glowing robes of throbbing muscle. Instead
of trying to solve the problem they slam their head against the wall until either their head
or the wall gives, and we all know how that contest usually turns out.
I think the reality of this is that results come into proportion to the love and interest you
put into what you are doing not some kind of “pain quota”; You take from it in proportion
to the joy you take in what you are doing. One thing about suffering desperate people is
that they don't listen well and they certainly don't pay attention; its easy not to pay
attention to something you hate, something that hurts you where you see no payoff for
doing it in itself. People who enjoy what they are doing, even though it may certainly be
tough at times are paying attention, they are observing, thinking, learning and improving
since they like where they are and what they are doing. Challenges and some kinds of
pain are part of it, but just part of it, something you learn to deal with but not the whole
point itself.
One way to tell a real lifter from the “I do weights” guys is by noting how much they
want to get into the gym, under the bar and on with the job, not out of the gym away from
the bar and out for the count. When you find excuses to work-out and not excuses to toss
it for that day, your chances of success are way up.
Weightlifting is a big world. If you don't like what you are doing find something else; no
amount of pure catharsis is going to get you to the winners circle. Find what you like
doing, honestly like doing. If you have found what you like to do, are paying attention,
are learning and are improving based on what you learn, you are hard to stop. If you go
into the gym each time with a couple of new little details to try, some adjustment or two
based on what you have observed or learned or have new a whole new idea to work with,
you are way ahead of the “zombie-cisers”.
If there are strength gods or goddesses up there I can't imagine that they would mind a
church full of happy people who keep coming back and have stuff to contribute other than
stories of plagues and tribulation.
Bryce Lane
March 3, 2005
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50-20

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:09 pm

Have it all!
Bryce Lane 3-6-02

The basics:
I have thought many times about one workout that could give you "it all" or as close to it as possible. A simple, short, to the point workout where you would get stronger in a very practical sense, increase your work capacity and conditioning level and add bulk if you eat like you mean business. A no-nonsense workout that could take you from dweeb to superhuman for the price of blood, sweat and twenty minutes of your TeeVee time a few days a week. I got the basic idea for this from an article by Charles Staley called "Escalating density training" which was more about bodybuilding. This is a great deal more general and is aimed at people who want "the big picture", and the bigger the better.
Here's how it works. For twenty minutes you do as many reps as you can of your chosen compound exercise, squats, deadlifts, power cleans or snatches, clean & presses etc. You do this twice a week. You use the same weight throughout the twenty minutes. About 75-80% of your gym-maximum in good clean form is fine to start. Begin with something you can easily do and add as you can.
Do sets of twos, threes or even fives or tens, your choice, mix it up if you need to. Do a set and when you are able to focus again, do another. When you can get the right number of reps in twenty minutes then up the weight 5-10% next time and work up again. I like 10% jumps since I tend to do better with a bigger drop in volume and more of a challenge with the weight. However if you like the more gradual approach then by all means, use it.
I try to shoot for fifty in twenty minutes since that number both keeps up my heart rate and breathing and makes it possible for me to use heavy weight in the 75-85% range. However the number you choose could just as well be anywhere between 20 (anything less than this isn't really doing much) and 100 reps (higher than this and the weight may be too small). If you can do 100 reps with 1.5 x bodyweight in 20 min. in the squat then you are one very conditioned individual with plenty of useful strength as well. That’s something to shoot for; or 50 reps 2 x bodyweight in 20 min. in the squat or 50 reps x bodyweight in the barbell clean and press are other worthy goals. I'm sure you can see the idea.
Here are a few exercise combinations you might consider.

My Favorite:
Mon/Thur.-- Barbell Clean & press-20min
Tues/Fri-- OL Squat -20min
Another:

Mon/Thur--Deadlift--20min
Tues/Fri--Dips + chins supersetted-20min. (there are many combinations to do this way)
Or:

Mon/Thurs--DB Clean & Press--20min
Tues/Fri--DB Farmers walk--20min (intervals of as long as you can go instead of reps)

For odd object fanatics:
Mon/thur--Barrel or sandbag clean & press--20 min.
Tues/fri--heavy object carry for distance--20min (intervals of as long as you can go instead of reps)

Or:
Mon/thurs--Rock or barrel lift --20min
Tue/Fri--Sandbag curl& press, Farmers walk each 20min. (if you are very-very serious)

You get the idea. Use compound exercises that will get your heart and lungs going along with everything else. If you want to do an assistance exercise or two, do them afterwards and not too many of them. For most of you that won't be much of a problem for obvious reasons. I like doing rockovers (tilt up barbell then support in balance with one hand) and curls. When you are finished, lay down, get your breath back and go have a carton of milk, a protein drink, or eat a nice big meal. You just earned it.
At the same time you have done many lifts with a high percentage of your max, you have gotten your heart and lungs working "overtime-plus", you have done a great deal of "work" in the mechanical sense, and you have only used twenty minutes to do the whole job.
If you start by doing 30 reps with say 300# in the squat and after a couple of sessions you get fifty, You are of course stronger, you have increased your conditioning and work capacity and if you eat enough decent food you will likely increase your muscle mass also. You can pretty much forget about all the complicated set/rep and weekly schemes and simply concentrate on doing
more work in your allotted time. When you reach fifty reps or your chosen number, then you increase the weight and work up again.
Helpers
Is it really that simple? For the most part, yes. However not everything is so smooth sometimes, you will have staleness and reverses eventually. Here are a few little detours to make sure your progress continues.
The first is to take a week off from the regular work and do only heavy singles. Go in and work up to one to three reasonably heavy singles in your chosen lifts, you can do this every day or every other day. I like every day, but some people don't get along well with that and should go every other day or monday/wed/friday. Some of you may find it useful to do three weeks of the regular twenty minute sets and then on the last week of the four, do the singles, find out how much stronger you are now and get a little bit of a rest before you go full out again.
Another approach is suppose you simply can’t get past 300# x40 in your twenty minutes of squatting? You can keep hammering away or you can increase the weight to 325# or 330#, then work up to thirty with that, then drop back to the 300#'s and get the fifty much easier. You can also take all the time you like to get the correct number of reps and then aim for decreasing the time it takes you to do them till you get down under 20min.
Yet another is for if you are more interested in the conditioning aspect or tend to run out of breath quicker than you might like. You drop the weight a bit and work towards doing many more reps than fifty. Use that as a starting point and shoot for the moon. Work up to one hundred reps if you can. If you can do that with anything over 1.5x bodyweight then there is not much in nature, sports, work or life that will wear you out.
One more idea is to pick a similar exercise and change to that one for awhile. It should be very similar though. Switching from full squats to leg presses, isn't going to be a big help, but changing from squats to, front squats or deadlifts would be fine. You will still be getting plenty of work, that’s for sure!
One way to arrange a program using a couple of these strategies is:

Three weeks:
Mon/Thurs --BB Clean & Press--20min
Tues/Fri--OL Squats--20 min

One week
M,W,F,--BB Clean & press--work up to near max single
T,Th, Sat,--OL Squat--work up to near max single

Three weeks
Mon/thur--Bench press--20min
Tues/Fri-- Deadlift, trap bar Deadlift or high pull--20min

One week
Mon/thur--Bench press-- work up to near max single
Tues/Fri-- Deadlift, trap bar Deadlift or high pull-- work up to near max single

And so on in a two month repeating cycle. There are other ways using these ideas also that you can easily imagine on your own.
This is "the whole enchilada" so to say. I could make this a much longer article but it really is this simple. You can get stronger, better conditioned, and even bigger in twenty minutes a day, four days a week. If there is a better deal out there, buy it, then write me!
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'Fighting Power'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:12 pm

The Ultimate Brute-Force Real World He-Man Power Program?

I don’t think there is such a thing, but if there is then this program would be mighty close to it. I often think about how to construct a program that give you the biggest return from two or three simple exercises per workout in the least amount of time. A workout that would be good for people who don't care about looking pretty as much as working or fighting harder. A workout that applies all the way from the grip to every other part of your body that has anything to do with moving people or objects. A workout that makes sure all your strength isn't only one shot strength also.
Here it is from simple beginnings to a top end tough enough for anyone with the attitude and desire necessary to get there. You will need one of those 15.5 gal beer kegs, a wall, a bit of liftin' space and the burning desire to knock out brahma bulls with one easy punch, then lift and carry em' to the next county over.
Before you do this one, start with an empty keg to get the feel of it and then fill it to a weight you can do four reps with on alternating shoulders (two to each shoulder consecutively).

Level One Beginners (2x weekly):
Shoulder the keg on alternating shoulders for as many as you can do in ten minutes, resting if you have to. Try and increase the number of reps as you can.
Do as many feet elevated pushups as you can such that your body is level at the top
When you can do about fifty reps in the ten minutes with the barrel 1/3 to 1/2 full and you can do 60 reps in the pushup then go on to:

Level two (3 times weekly)
Shoulder the keg on alternating shoulders for as many reps as you can do in twenty minutes trying over time to work up to 50 reps (25 to each shoulder) with a full keg (165#) in that twenty minutes.
Headstand pushups with soles of feet on the wall working up to 20 reps with your hands up on blocks and your head going all the way down between reps. Get up to the twenty first with your hands on the ground and then add thin plates, boards or blocks till your hands are touching your shoulders on the down.
You are now uno strong hombre, but not strong enough you say?! Well "butch up" yet further and do…..:

Level three (3 times weekly)
Barrel clean for as many reps as you can get in 20 min with a full barrel
Handstand pushups up on blocks with soles of feet up/legs straight; trying not to touch the wall any more than necessary for thirty reps
When you can do these things brace yourself, and then face…

Above and Beyond !! ( 3 times or more weekly depending on how you feel)
Barrel Snatch/Swing (overhead in one move) working up to ten reps with water, shoulder the barrel or even Clean & press with barrel of sand (200# full), or wet sand (270#'s full). You are now a complete barrel tossin' mutant-monster who should be careful not to accidentally hurt others and thus may choose lifts for himself on that day.
Freestanding headstand pushups with no wall and hands up on blocks for as many reps as you can work up as high as you like, this is all gravy now.
It is not all this straight a climb up but by simply backing off a bit when you feel tired, taking a day off now and then or getting a little creative with your reps it can be done.
Do it outside if you can. If you are going to be a "he-man" you might as well get some sunshine while you're at it!
Bryce Lane 06-03-02

***Note from Jman: TheMasterKey and T_M_D were using this one for a while, I think it went pretty well for them. There was also a guy who said he got great results from this one a few years ago, weighed about 200, had a 300 push press and 600 deadlift... worked up to 55 reps of shouldering a 200# sandbag in 20 minutes, and a 300# bag for a single; and a ton of HSPU on chairs too. This is a SOLID program, one of the best variants of the '50-20' idea that there is.
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'Double Trouble'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:16 pm

This is something I have been thinking about for some time. Taking two methods I know work and combining them together to create something that is hopefully better than both by themselves. Its experimental but if you want to do the experiment, if you are one of those people who just have to have the hood up, the truck on stands and the toolbox out on Sundays-this is for you. I'm going to just suggest a framework but you can make what you wish out of the idea for your own purposes. I like training for strength/endurance or work capacity. Right up the middle between strength, mass and endurance-the best of all three in a tight and quick routine. You can easily modify this however for anything you like after giving it a little thought.
The idea here is that most hormonal changes for strength or strength endurance are produced not by just "working a muscle" but by loading up your spine and hips and doing something with that load. Hardly a new idea, lots of the old guys understood this and there is allot more you can do with it if you understand the idea. If you can create the right hormonal environment, much else tends to ride along really well if you know how they can complement each other:
Here is a sample cycle: For two weeks: Mon. & Thurs: Rack squat, as many reps as you can get in 20m. Start with a weight you can get perhaps ten straight reps with, when you get up to 50 in 20m, and then increase the weight Every day: Pick two upper body exercises and stick with them. Something like overhead presses and chin ups. Don't "stress out". Do several sets of three reps each during the day, or if you don't have that kind of time, do a few sets every evening with a weight you can do the lift smoothly with. You work to make the lifts fast, powerful and crisp. If you stall at the sticking point in the press or have to struggle to get the chin up; It’s too heavy. Lighten up the bar or take weight off the belt. When all three reps go up crisply in one second for each rep, then increase the weight a little. This is a way to get a lift progressing fast by working on "power" or force times speed. Some people call this "neuro-muscular facilitation or "greasing the groove" but it’s not quite the same. You are working on speed. If you can make the bar or yourself move fast enough, then it’s time for more resistance. You are simply using speed as your "marker" rather than reps. This also keeps the fatigue level down so you can go all-out on the 20minute lift while still keeping all your lifts moving along together.
For the next two weeks: Mon. & Thurs : Conventional Deadlift, as many reps as you can get in 20m. Start with a weight you can get perhaps ten straight reps with, when you get up to 50 then increase the weight. Same as the squat before. You can also substitute RDL's, SLDLs or heavy high pulls but keep it heavy. Dinky Power Cleans or darling flip snatches just won't do. Every day: The same. Same lifts just keep working as explained before. For another two weeks: Mon. & Thurs: Sumo Deadlift, as many reps as you can get in 20m. Start with a weight you can get perhaps ten straight reps with, when you get up to 50 then increase the weight. Same as before just enough of a different lift to keep things moving. Everyday: The same. Same lifts just keep working as explained above. Then repeat this cycle for another six weeks after a 1 week rest.
What is happening here is that the big exercise creates an anabolic environment which along with working your lower body (and much more) the spinal loading and volume creates an environment hormonally conducive to getting better at that kind of work....for a while and that's the issue. To keep this going you have to rotate the "big" exercise before you adapt and get stale to keep this going. And every now and then you have to rest to reset a bit. The anabolic environment you create with your big exercise by keeping it just "fresh enough" to stay in "gaining mode". This in-turn provides a hormonal environment favorable to gaining on your upper body work consistently without "going over the top". Using that environment to magnify the results of another complimentary training mode. Instead of one or the other, you use each to magnify the other beyond what either could do itself. You are keeping the stress where it belongs in creating the right hormonal balance for improvement and skillfully "surfing" on that wave without creating so much fatigue that you wipe-out. You should keep some good progress going with fewer plateaus. This is based on some of the newer thinking about how we actually do gain strength, endurance or speed along with what I've observed with myself and other people in those rare times when we seem to be able to "do no wrong" in the gym. "


***Note from Jman: Josh, Dave, this is the 'rotating lifts' article I was referring to. If you don't want the '20 minute' lift destroying everything else you're working on (which it definitely will) Some kind of ramped thing could work too.
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'Around the World'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:19 pm

Around the world in 12 working days!
Make yourself a chart. "Bb" is for Barbell, "Db" is for dumbell, and "Kb" is for adjustable kettlebells if you have them (if you don't then just use the closest standard weight). If you don’t then you will make it around the world in eight days. The weights are posted after the name of the lift, "2/3 bdy" is a total load whether it is divided between two kbs, two dbs or one bb. For the one arm lifts where there is an implement in only one hand you will see it is half that. What you do is simply choose two lifts for the day, workout five or six days a week and do a set at the weight specified. This is for as many reps as you can. If it is a one arm lift, start with your weaker hand, do as many as you can, immediately switch to the stronger hand and match the number of reps. Do one all out set and perhaps a couple of lesser sets afterwards for practice. Write down your number in the correct place and proceed to fill out the chart over a couple of weeks.
An arrangement like:
Day1- A Press and a Clean
Day2- A Jerk and a Snatch

Mix them up such that if you do a two arm press one day, the next press day is one arm etc. When the chart is full, then start another cycle and try to break those rep records this time. There is enough variety here in good lifts to where you should not wear out too much on any one, and it should stay fun. These lifts should reinforce each other even though you are not hammering on one lift too often. Work out five or six days a week, if you feel tired or feel that chronic soreness, take a day or two off, it’s not a race. The idea is taken from the sport idea I posted lately, a comment by Louie Simmons ("Of course you can work out everyday, just do a different lift everyday"--bad paraphrase but...) and Kettlebell lifting. This is more of a thing for all-rounders. If you are after explosive strength endurance, keep running up the reps. If you want more strength exclusively, then pick some number like 12 or 20 and when you hit that, then add weight.

***Note from Jman: Bryce had some awesome ideas concerning repetition overhead lifting. This is one of 'em. I think with a bit of tweaking you could incorporate some odd objects too, or something else, even if you don't have BB and DB and KB you could still do 'around the world in 8 days' or 6 days or whatnot. Add some free squats and you'd be all set for a GPP/'dad strength' kinda program.
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Wall-only circuits: '1011'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:21 pm

I wrote this down and worked on it in various forms but for some reason it never made it out into the light....there are some vile-evil things that should never see daylight, this is likely one of them, but here it is anyway.
10 Jump squat
1 ballistic pushup
1 wall walk (down and up)
15 second rest after you get to 3pu-ww/30sq reps Looks simple enough, it is easy to count this way... but try this, there is a "surprise" in here. do this in circuits adding one to the pushups and wall walks and ten to the jump squats each round. Do the jumps squats up-to or over something safe, to make sure you get some height. The ballistic pushups can be clapping, up to or over something Ross style, egyptian or sprawl pushups-Me style etc. Just keep it fast and mean, no unballistic-ballistics. If it gets slow and boggy...quit. With most people the wall walks are going to be the problem. Keep some kind of mat under your head! The fun part is that by tossing this in, you have to "change gears"...drastically and precisely at the wrong moments.

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Wall-only circuits: 'the wheel of doom'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:22 pm

The Wall Workout
Get in the position like a pushup with your heels against the wall, do 20 (or whatever) pushups, walk up a step or two and twenty more and so on until you get a couple as close to vertical as you can. Let your head down and let your feet fall away from the wall until you are in a bridge, hold it for a count of 100. Do as many reverse pushups as you can from there then walk up and down the wall as many times as you can, or for the advanced version do the "circle of doom" which follows:
1.) Get in the pushup position then walk back towards the wall with your hands and up the wall with your feet.
2.) From the top lower your head gently and let your feet drop away from the wall till you are in a bridge then walk up the wall with your hands.
3.) once you are standing up, fall back into the pushup position and repeat. If you want to get really "advanced", then reverse direction and do the "wheel of doom" the other way. You might be asking "Hey Bryce, you _________, where is the leg work?" Well, try it, try to find what isn't tired. I was showing the "wheel of doom" to someone so they could "freak out people" and it occured to me that you could turn this into a real Mini-workout of its own that could be done anywhere you have floor and a wall. When you are practiced enough to be smooth it just looks wild.
Bryce

***Note from Jman: The last two are fun things to use as finishers or maybe as a standalone thing if all you have is wall/floor space. Haven't actually tried 'em myself but they look pretty useful to me.
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Bryce on Side Presses

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:24 pm

1.) Press the bar away from you as you bend. Do not press it up too early, do not be too relaxed. This takes a certain sense you develop with practice.
2.) As you are bending and pressing, push slightly towards your head. This helps straighten your arm a great deal.
3.) Point your foot opposite your pressing arm in the direction you are bending. In fact don't "bend" as much as throwing your hip under your lifting arm like you are doing "the bump". The "bend is not in the sides (obliques) but in sliding your hip over your lifting foot. Mastering this is the most important thing.
4.) If you get stuck, let the rear end of the bar drop a few inches, just a slight tilt and that will often help you through a "sticky spot".
5.) Get the elbow of your lifting arm as far onto your back (flexed lat muscle) as you can before you take off. This is worth a lot.
6.) No matter whether you are using a bar or a dumbell, make sure that the handle or bar is parallel to the line of your shoulders before you go.
7.) This is NOT a lift you are going to get good at overnight. Practice with light warmups before the days big lifts. Do not strain at this or you will develop bad habits and reinforce them by doing it wrong repeatedly. Practice with weights in the 60-80% range, if the bar or dumbell halts of stutters at any part of the lift you are using too much weight. You must get good and precise, "strong" will follow. Save the stress for very occasional max attempts, build this over time.

I didn't feel anything in the lats, I always caught it in my sides. It was also hard on my wrists, I have very small wrists and even benching is a problem for me.
I worked up to 135x1 in 3 week linear cycles as describe in the Pavel book. It worked very well, every three weeks I added about ten pounds to the lift, however this concept was not very successful with some other lifts. The devil is always in the details, clichéd but true enough to become one.
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Bryce on Getups

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:25 pm

Strong as your weakest link.
This article is about another way of looking at strength; Perhaps a very practical one for some sports or even general fitness. I'm going to use as an example an exercise where a weight is bought from the floor to overhead in several chained-together movements. The lift is called a "Turkish Get up" and has been around for quite a time. You can find pictures of it on the net. I will use this as an example but with very little effort you should be able to put the principle to work on many other one handed lifts such as the one handed clean and side (or bent) press etc. that involve long chains of movements
I'm basing this idea on a couple of issues of I have noticed particularly about combat sports.
1.) The vast majority of efforts are applied asymmetrically (not evenly from both sides at once) from changing and less than optimal positions.
2.) A huge squat or bench press is useless unless the rest of your body is up to controlling, focusing and delivering the force (even slowly) in those positions.
Working by this method insures that both conditions are tended to; and in fact it is self-checking and always gives you some means of progressing and diagnosing why you are not progressing. You also have a goal to work towards with smaller goals in between to check progress.
1.) Use a bar and lay down beside it. Use both hands and roll till the bar is supported with your forearm with you elbow in the ground. Let go and balance it with your lifting hand
2.) While pressing the bar to arm’s length roll onto the side away from the bar and keep your free arm extended out on the platform above your head. While locking out the press with your lifting hand, press with your free hand until you are sitting up halfway and the free arm is locked.
3.) While balancing the bar overhead roll over one knee and then into a split overhead squat. Come from there up to standing with the bar still locked at arm’s length.
Let’s assume that you do the lift and find out that you can do a good clean TGU with fifty pounds and that you yourself weigh 150#. Bodyweight is a great long term goal in this lift. However going straight there might not be too likely so it’s a good idea to divide up the distance between "can do now" and "want to do later" into manageable chunks. In this case things divide into twenty five pound chunks pretty nicely. You will work for seventy five pounds next and one hundred after that.
When you tested yourself in the lift you found as said, that you could do fifty pounds well, but when you added weight and went to fifty five pounds you found you could not do it. You must look at where in the lift you ran into trouble, but you must be careful about one issue as well. The issue is that if you are unsteady or out of position at the end of one segment then you can hardly
be ready for the next. You must be cautious in your diagnosis to make sure the earlier segment isn't causing this problem in the following segment. If you complete one segment perfectly and are in good position for the next which you can't do, then the next is what needs work; however if you are unsteady or awkward at the end of a segment then you need to work on that itself.
Let’s say you manage to get your arm up with the weight and are on your side trying to sit up, but you can't. Your technique is good and you are in position but you just can't do it. Now you have your answer as to where to work You must work on this one part, simply this segment then integrate it back into the whole. Suppose you get to sitting up but cannot roll onto your feet? Well then you work on that portion and if you get to your feet but lose control squatting up, then you work there.
Here is the whole movement divided into smaller movements:
The workout breaks down as:
1.) Do the full lift with a reasonably easy weight working on perfect execution and technique in single repetitions
2.) An assistance lift base on which portion of the whole is giving you trouble or holding you back in several sets and repetitions with a challenging weight.
For example in this "split routine"
Monday and Thursday- Right arm: Full TGU with 3 singles with a comfortable weight then, five sets of five reps in the portion that is giving you trouble.
Tuesday and Friday-Left arm: Full TGU with 3 singles with a comfortable weight then, five sets of five reps in the portion that is giving you trouble.
If this is too easy then you can go alternately six days a week or alternately on every other day. What matters is to find a workout frequency that you can live with long term and every now and then take a good look and make alterations if you need to. If you are feeling wiped out, do less. If its too easy and you feel energetic then work out more frequently. Every month or so check your maximum and see what segment needs extra work to get to your next twenty five pound goal.
There is also no reason you could not do this with two or even three lifts concurrently. The TGU and a one arm clean and press or one arm snatch might be good matches.
The positives of this sort of arrangement is that if you get a certain weight overhead in good style, you know that every part is contributing as it should. Your arm is strong, your midsection is doing its part and your legs and hips are putting-in as well. Not only that but you are applying force and controlling the weight dynamically. You are not just standing or laying down and pushing, you have to be in control as you are moving. If you do this with a heavy weight in good form it proves that everything is up to the job. Not only can you generate force but you can direct it and control it as you are moving from one difficult position to another. *That* is a very useful kind of strength.
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Bryce on Wrestling training

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:26 pm

In wrestling you have to last for two three minute rounds going at full force and
it usually turns into three 3min rounds. If you have any hope of winning you still
need to be capable of making explosive efforts all the way through, even though
you are bearing someone else’s weight and your head is spinning. So the recipe is to do ALOT of explosive efforts working well into severe "anaeorobicness" 25 reps won't even come close to the sort of endurance under load you need to survive a tournament.
Strength work has its place also but if you are not "in shape" it won't help a darn bit in a real match! Shape means to me 500 straight free squats or 100 jumping squats. 100 straight dive bomber pushups, 30-50 clean & presses with a half full beer keg to begin with (more hopefully). 50-100 reps in the db clean & push press with 1/4 bodyweight per dumbell. It also includes running a mile at full speed with no breathers in under six min.
Pure strength work (grip particularly can be cycled in regularly, but if you can't complete the match at full force you won't win!
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'About Power'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:27 pm

Angels, Astrology, destiny, reincarnation? Fug-ed-about-it; The universe is about one thing and that is “what pushes what into what else, and how hard”. It’s all about power, who has it, who wants it and who has to deal with the consequences; the “doers” and the “done to”. If you are out on the field, court or mat, which one do you want to be?
Physical power is not only about strength, that’s only part of it. Power is about how much force you can deliver in a very short time. Suppose you have two athletes, one who can squat 500# and another who can squat 300#, they are of similar weights themselves. Looks easy so far, right? Let’s complicate this. Suppose upon watching these two wrestling, it becomes clear that the 300#sq guy is just making a fool of the 500#sq guy. He’s quick and once he commits he hits and follows through before Mr. 500# sq even knows he’s in trouble. Mr. 500# sq needs seconds to develop enough force and by then it’s already too late. Mr. 300#sq develops it well before Mr. 500#sq even realizes he’s looking at the ceiling and Mom is not going to be fixing him “victory supper”.
As you can see from the example and probably in real life, power is a far from one dimensional thing. It is impossible to separate power from strength, skill, conditioning and just plain quickness. Toss in some psych stuff and it gets even muddier. However just for the sake of having a definition that we can use, let’s call it the amount of force that can be delivered in a fixed amount of time.
Let’s say that you are training for a sport where there is not motion that lasts for more than a second. No matter what your maximum lifts are; if it takes longer than about half that to develop the force, what have you really got? Why work out to develop strength you cannot use? What use is a huge squat or deadlift if you will never in your sport have the opportunity to develop that kind of force? Why not work out in a way that will give you power you can use!
This is an all over whole body exercise that is all about power. It’s easy to do, very modifiable and highly effective. We call it “the cheerleader” here, but if you don’t like that name, make up your own.
I like this exercise because it is a “straight push”; your COG is right over your center. With pulls such as cleans and snatches your COG is forward. Olympic lifts are also difficult to teach and coach if you have a lot of guys in the room. I prefer to take something simple they can do, is effective and difficult to screw up really. I’d prefer to take that time I would use going around coaching and devote it to increasing power right away, after about five minutes of learning.
How to do it:
1.) Set the pins in the rack to the appropriate height. I like pushing it from rock bottom. Load the bar to a LIGHT weight to learn this.
2.) Get under with the bar high on your neck and your grip like you would use for a press behind the neck.
3.) Come up as fast and you can, very fast, so fast that the bar flies to arms’ length above your head.
4.) Let the bar back down cushioning it by lowering yourself back down at the same time for another rep.
(You can also do this with dumbbells or kettlebells if need be, it’s very similar and I’m sure you can figure it out)
This is the way I do it; Like a rack squat from “the hole” all the way down. I am interested in “general power”. However this is where it gets more versatile. You can alter the takeoff height to any level between my version and a simple “Jerk behind the neck”, based on the requirements of your sport and how close you may be to a competition.
Suppose you are a jumper, change your regular squats to these and as you get closer to a competition take the height up to your natural takeoff point, never work to fatigue and concentrate on one big “wham” of power and increasing the weight you can use while still being explosive. Power must be practiced!
If you are a wrestler or any sort of combat athlete, you need something different. Its good to have power but you must have it over and over. You must learn to work against fatigue and still be explosive. For this I would take some interval, say ten minutes, even twenty and do as many explosive reps all the way from the bottom as you can. Doing this in three minute intervals could be good too.
Suppose you are a “generalist” who just wants to be powerful and fit for just about anything, you can use something like:
Cheerleader 5x5
Plyo pushup or plyo bench 5x5
Explosive chin with top release (I love this one!)
Dumbell swings 100reps (50 each hand) as many sets as it takes
Don’t like mine? It isn’t rocket science, come up with your own, but remember to have power, you must practice power, as often as you can. Whatever exercise you are doing make it quick, not careless but quick. One other piece of advice I can give is to not get obsessed with weight, if you are shaky at the top or slow, you are not working on “POWER” anymore. Lower the weight till its snappy and you hear those plates clanking again at the top!
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'Fast Iron'

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:28 pm

Everyone I know complains about time, its “The great American excuse”. “I’d love to lift but I can’t miss the bowflex informercial”, I really expect to hear this someday.
Anyway here are some workouts that give you some mighty big bang for the buck in fifteen minutes or less, two or three times a week. The tricks are:

1.) Not to think in reps and sets but in time sections
2.) Think of one exercise or compound for the shoulder/arm area, lower back and upper legs if you have something that effectively covers more than one, then great!
3.) Pay attention to loading, make your exercises progress from light to heavy or heavy to light with no reverses so you don’t waste any more time changing plates than need be.
4.) Use the same equipment for everything, That way you you can stay in the same spot and not kill time cleaning up more than you have to.

Let take a first example:
2 Db Clean and press-As many as you can do in 3 min
Rest 1 min, add more weight to one DB
1 Db swings-As many as you can do in 3 min switching hands every 5 reps
Rest 1 min, add more weight to the other DB
2 Db toe squats- As many as you can do in 3 min
Try and use a weight where there aren’t many gaps in the 3 min. Work towards a certain number like 12-20 and then increase the weight.

Or with a barbell:
Floor press—As many as you can do in three min
Rest 2 min and add plates
Bent rows—Same
Rest 2 min and add plates
Deadlifts—Same

Or one of my favorites with a barbell. Its kind of crazy but….
Bridge press—3 min as many as you can
Rest 2 min
*Leg press—As many as you can safely in one set.
Rest 2 min, get up
High pulls—3 min. as many as you can.
*Performed by putting the bar on your feet and pressing it up on the soles of your feet after bridge pressing.

With one dumbbell:
DB swings or windmills--Same
Rest 1 min.
DB side presses switching sides every two reps—As many as you can do in 3 min.
Rest 1 min.
DB overhead squats –Same switching hands every five reps

For anyone interested in O-lifts:
Pwr Snatch— work up to near max single in 5 lifts, in 4 min.
Rest 2 min add more weight.
Pwr Clean and push press-- work up to near max single in 5 lifts, in 4 min.
Rest 2 min add more weight.
1 Clean then Front squats—As many as you can in 3 min. with best clean weight.
I’m sure you get the idea.
If you don’t have fifteen minutes sometime in your day, then you really need to re-examine your lifestyle. Its easy also to set up a simple home gym with a homemade 6’ exercise bar and plywood platform sheet or a pair of dumbbells on a rubber mat somewhere in a corner of your house, yard or garage. These kind of workouts are effective and won’t cut into your Sci-Fi channel time much at all.
Bryce Lane, Visalia Ca. 2003
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:45 pm

Somebody sticky plz, and feel free to discuss any and all of the articles on this and subsequent pages.
Bryce, even if he isn't really around anymore, is by far my favorite 'online internet trainer personality guru guy', and y'all can probably see why. Very innovative, sensible, openminded, willing to experiment.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Rastaman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:59 pm

Journeyman wrote:The Great Pyramid
By Bryce Lane 2004

In most things we do we consider that whatever it is we want there is simply more or less of it. You are either moving one way along the line, the other way, or staying put. However often the way you think about something, the way you model it in your head is everything. Simply asking a question well can give you the answer you want. Consider three kinds of strength:

1.) Continuous effort--Strength repeated continuously a lift or motion done for 10-15 min perhaps.
2.) Recoverable effort--Strength exerted intermittently in periods of high effort and recovery.
3.) One time effort--Done once with no likelihood of repeating in a reasonable time.

Let’s consider that you want to be as one time strong as possible. That puts #3 at the top, #1 at the bottom and #2 across the middle. Much of this is probably not new to you at this point in fact you might be saying "duh"; However let’s consider also a couple of variables, the first is the height of the point from its base and the second is the width of the base. Some of us have naturally or through some training very steep pyramids that come from a small base up to a steep point and other the opposite. I suspect that knowing this and how to work these two relations (the ratio between them) with each other is the real basis of any physical quality you wish to get more of.

Let’s take an athlete who had a 500# deadlift, and no matter how hard he trains he can't seem to exceed this point. Upon having an epiphany one day and half out of frustration he decides to do a longer set of 20 and discovers that the weight has to drop a very long way before he can do that. He discovers in his case that the triangle is very steep; the ratio of height to width is too high. So over the next few weeks he works on these 20 rep sets (yes plural now) and finds pretty rapid improvement. Pleased with this he continues until a point of diminishing returns when the numbers are not going up anymore in the 20's. He decides to go back to the singles and at first there is no difference but over a few more weeks what was 500# creeps up to 510# and then 525# and not only that but he can do more than that one big single and further that some of that dizziness he got on the top single is gone. Deciding this to be successful he decides to go even lower on the triangle and build up some endurance at the very base with hyper-extensions, swings and cleans for much more than 20 reps. After this he goes back to the twenties and then up to the singles again and same thing, but even somewhat better this time. Upon drawing this out on paper this lifter sees that when his triangle gets steep enough, progress stops yet when it widens out a bit, given time, progress returns. Upon looking at his training log it seems like if he spends 20% of his time at the baseline, 20% in the middle and 60% at the top (just examples) then progress continues and not only that but he feels better and has seen his own feet over his gut for the first time in years.

For any other of the three you can simply rotate the triangle with what you want on top. For example if you are after extreme endurance have #1 on top, #2 in the middle and #3 on the bottom. If you are after truck loading kind of work capacity then put #2 on top, and #3 or #1 on the bottom or middle depending on how heavy those boxes really are, but you get the point. If progress stops on your peak item then go down to the bottom, give it some time and work your way back up till the triangle proportions are conducive to progress again. I think everyone for many reasons has a steepness in this shape that suits them and if you don't' recognize it and work with it, you get stuck. There is some mix of these three kinds of work that will make your particular triangle go up the quickest in the long term. It’s one thing to understand this and many people do, but it’s another to have the patience and foresight to figure out your particular numbers and put them into practice long term.
All the good recipes I know of are not all about more or less of one single ingredient but the just-right proportion of all of them and then cooked patiently for just the right amount of time.

Without realising, each time Ive reached a plateau in progress I've been applying this pyramid to a certain extent, although most of the time without enough patience.

Bryce has some great articles, but this one and in particular ' have the patience and foresight to figure out your particular numbers and put them into practice long term', is his best advice.

Thanks for sharing J-man.

Should definitely be Stickied!


Last edited by Rastaman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 5:39 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 07, 2013 5:14 pm

No problem man. I think those first three I posted, those 'theories of training' articles... those are the best. Very usable advice. Analyze, simplify, adapt, progress.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Iliander on Mon Jan 07, 2013 5:28 pm

Journeyman wrote:Somebody sticky plz, and feel free to discuss any and all of the articles on this and subsequent pages.
Bryce, even if he isn't really around anymore, is by far my favorite 'online internet trainer personality guru guy', and y'all can probably see why. Very innovative, sensible, openminded, willing to experiment.
Trying to sticky this topic, but can't find how. Dave? :scratch:
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Dave on Mon Jan 07, 2013 9:18 pm

Actually, due to the large number of stickies in this section, I've decided to create an "articles" section. This will be there as well for sure.

But FYI - edit the original post, scroll down and underneath it you'll see a check box for making it a sticky.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Dave on Mon Jan 07, 2013 9:19 pm

And yes, I've read the first two so far - I do remember seeing these before, I think Jman you posted them or sent them to me. I probably have some of them on my 'puter in fact. Anyway, reading them again has been rewarding, thanks. Will get to the rest as time permits.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Josh T. on Tue Jan 08, 2013 9:47 am

I like the way this guy thinks. Jman, I asked you a question regarding the lift rotations over at my log.

Also, this guy is yet another reminder that if I want to be the explosive dude I'm capable of being, I need to start pushing more power/speed work in my training. This cycle is definitely gonna be a start to doing that. If I get to the point where I can dunk with 2 hands off my vertical (I can barely grab the rim with both off a vertical jump right now), I would be freakin' ecstatic.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:11 pm

^ He is/was big on jumping for reps, which is something I haven't heard that much of before. For example, jumps over a hurdle to the front or side, aiming for 50-100 consecutive reps or a certain number of reps in 10, 20 or 30 minutes. Bryce said they were great for olympic lifting.

I think the Russians do a lot of that too, or used too... some of the Soviet Olifters would do 10x10 hurdle jumps and increase hurdle height over time.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Dave on Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:26 pm

It stands to reason that if Oly lifting assists your jumping, then jumping can assist your Oly lifting. Never thought about that before though.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:41 pm

Not everything carries over both ways like that; but it can't hurt to experiment....
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Josh T. on Tue Jan 08, 2013 6:47 pm

Nope. Even if it doesn't work, you live and learn. For example, I think doing box jumps dead stop from a seated position could help you out of the hole in squatting (dependent upon if you started where you struggle out of the hole). Also, weighted box jumps like that could help too, and I've seen someone somewhere in the fitness world that I read regularly do something like that. May experiment with that one day as well.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by itlives on Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:56 am

Thanks for making these available! I really enjoyed "The Joy of Suffering" .
It can be applied to every facet of life!

Will get to the rest as time permits.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Dave on Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:08 pm

This awesome thread deserves a table of contents. I've added one to the first post.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Cesar on Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:57 pm

I really enjoyed reading ultimate brute force and have it all.

simple TVT using compound exercises.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Wed Jan 09, 2013 5:02 pm

CV, that's great; I didn't know you tried or were trying those... when was it and what were the gains like?

And thanks Dave, that makes navigating that first page much easier.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Cesar on Wed Jan 09, 2013 5:33 pm

Journeyman wrote:CV, that's great; I didn't know you tried or were trying those... when was it and what were the gains like?

And thanks Dave, that makes navigating that first page much easier.

Jman - I tried the brute strength for a short period of time. not enough to see much progress. I used my sandbag at 100lbs for 50+ reps in 10:00 and some push ups. I then added 25lbs to the bag and then lost motivation.
The "have it all" is interesting too. it makes me think of what Squatty is doing. again TVT and lots of compounds exercises. I have done it with dips and pull ups. i liked it, numbers went up quick back in september during the pull up challenge.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Fri Jan 11, 2013 1:48 am

That's great CV, thanks for sharing. You could do some really effective combos with 5020; especially if you combined various methodologies....

Pure conditioning:
Day 1 kettlebell C&J (long cycle)
Day 2 b/w squat variant, going for high reps (200-300 or more) in 20.00

Odd object lifting ability:
Day 1 sandbag C&P
Day 2 sandbag bearhug squat

Base for Olifting:
Day 1 push jerks from the rack
Day 2 clean or snatch pull

Base for PL:
Day 1 incline bench
Day 2 front squat or stiffleg deadlift (alternate)

Base for kettlebell sport:
Day 1 snatch
Day 2 jerk
or
Day 1 heavy one arm swing
Day 2 heavy one arm jerk
or, for longcycle--
Day 1 C&J
Day 2 squat

'Ungrooved' strength:
Day 1 reverse grip OHP
Day 2 dumbbell deadlift

Throwing/power production:
Day 1 muscle snatch
Day 2 box or front squat

Obstacle racing (which seems to be getting popular these days!)
Day 1 burpees
Day 2 pullups
--pretty simple. Or maybe rope climbs on day 1 and lunges for distance on day 2...


Endless possibilities with the 'work in a set time block' kinda deal, it really might be one of the more flexible training methods in terms of what you can use it for (strength, endurance, etc.)

Something else bryce wrote somewhere that wasn't in an article so I didn't put it up: Cycling from high to low reps. You start with something where you can manage 100 reps in 20 minutes, and add weight, still doing as many as you can, but eventually get driven down to 50 in 20. Then take a break and start a new cycle or switch lifts.

Of course, you don't have to do 50-100 reps at all, you could just use 20min as a general guideline (yeah I've had way too many ideas running around lately, haha).
You could definitely do 20 singles in 20 minutes, using, say, the Joe Mills 20/20 program.
5 singles with a light weight, all the same weight
5 singles with a slightly heavier (but still light) weight
5 singles with a heavier weight, still paused/speed, not struggling
5 progressively heavier singles, with the 5th one being either a max or PR attempt. When you hit this, move all the weights up by 5#

It was designed for Olifting, and you'd just do the full lifts with it. But for a guy built to pull, who could DL twice weekly without burning out... you could definitely do Day 1: press, Day 2: deadlift; with the first weekly session aiming for a PR and the second working up to 90% of that, followed by accessory (squat/bench?) work. Either way, 1 single a minute would keep your heart rate up just enough, without adversely affecting the lifting itself.
Singles/doubles on a timer opens up a whole other realm of good ideas :mrgreen:

edit #2: one more good idea based off the last one, then I'm done for the night....
The 20/20 Mills program was meant to be done with both lifts on one day (20x1 snatch, 20x1 C&J) three days a week. IT's a very rough program. So, my alternative: C&P followed by DL (just keep adding weight to the bar), two days a week. The other two days do a circuit of dips, pullups, squat/pistol/shrimp or whatever.
That's kinda based off of my 'DL, overhead, squat/dip/pullup' idea... just one way to do it. I really like that idea, actually; I'll have to put it on my list of programs I wanna try someday.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Cesar on Fri Jan 11, 2013 11:25 am

So you are saying, picking any of the two day combos and do that twice per week or pick two pairs for the week?

I like the pairs btw. they look intense. I do enjoy the 20:00 min blocks.
what I do is get my gymboss and bang out 2-3 reps every :30 secs for the entire time. That is how I went to 50+ reps (I think it was 55 but not sure) in 10:00 with the 100lbs sandbag. I was gassed.

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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Journeyman on Fri Jan 11, 2013 3:50 pm

Well, those were just possible combos off the top of my head; day 1 is mon/thurs and day 2 is tues/fri or whatever. Two lifts, each twice a week.

2-3 reps every .30 is good, another way to do it is just a triple every minute, which'll get you to 60 reps... or 10x5, every other minute. Or you could just do as many as possible in every set, stopping 1 short of failure, every 1.30 to 2.00, whenever you feel ready... this seems to get me to 50+ if I go with a 10-12 rep weight. 10x10 (for 100 in 20) is good for conditioning with light DL or squat variants.
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Re: Best of Bryce Lane

Post by Cesar on Fri Jan 11, 2013 4:21 pm

Def.
when shouldering 100lbs bag, i started with 3 reps every 30 secs but then towards the end i dropped to 2 reps per 30 secs, i was gassed. so that is why i did not get the 60 reps.
It all depends on the movement that you pick and the weight as well. when I added the 25lbs to the bag (125lbs) there was no way to keep the 3 rep scheme for long. I was gassed after the 3rd min.
10x10 is a nice deal as well. i do that with dive bombers and burpees.
When i got down to 9:00 for 100 burpees I was doing 11 per min plus 12 on the last one. I was gassed and pushed hard but it was well worth it.
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