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Just cool stuffs

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Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sun Jan 20, 2013 9:04 pm

I tend to start a lot of threads... just gonna start stockpiling new articles, nuggets, videos, etc. in this one to save space.


http://articles.elitefts.com/training-articles/efs-classic-the-science-of-winning-according-to-vasili-alexeyev/

Only had time to skim it just now but it's really really good. Lots of good advice on training mindset, becoming stronger etc. even if you aren't a lifter. It has Dave Tate's vote, too!
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Wed Jan 23, 2013 11:36 pm

Dom mazetti on arm training:


"If I wanted to train legs, I'd be in the squat rack. Which I am."
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Wed Jan 23, 2013 11:37 pm

The "other" ken leistner article:

Fifty-Rep Sets
A very effective means of breaking through boredom or sticking points in training is the 50-rep set. I first began doing this many years ago, and was surprised that I gained so much strength. Most trainees will tell you that endurance will increase doing 50-rep sets, and that is true, but if the 50-rep set is done so that the set ends at a point of momentary muscular fatigue/failure, you will also get strong. It is best to do this for only two to three weeks at a time due to the severity of the program and the difficulty in recovering from it. Choose four to six exercises that provide muscular work for the entire body. Using a barbell, I would do: 1. squats 2. stiff-legged deadlifts while standing on an elevated surface 3. bench presses or dips 4. curls or chin-ups 5. shrugs or upright rows I would take a weight that I thought I could do 20-25 good reps with, perform as many reps as possible, replace the bar on the rack or floor, rest ten seconds, again do as many reps as possible, rest ten seconds, and continue in that manner until 50 repetitions, were completed. In the squat, for example, I would use approximately 275 lbs and do 25-30 reps, put the bar on the rack, take a few deep breaths, take the bar again, gut out 4 or 6 more reps, back away from the rack, take the bar again for 3 or 4 reps, rest perhaps fifteen seconds, and try to finish the set. I never allowed myself to take more than five "rest stops" during the course of the exercise. After squats, I would wait two to three minutes, and then continue with the next exercise. This was brutally hard work, and in the first two workouts, limitations in cardiovascular ability halted me as much as muscular failure. However, I quickly adapted to the program and found that I could develop incredible mental toughness during the actual workout. At that point, when I reached 50 reps, I couldn't do number 51 because I was shaking so badly and could barely direct the working bodypart to function. The key lies in viewing this not as an endurance type workout but as a brutally hard strength training workout.
I don't recommend doing the overhead press because the low back will be too fatigued to allow the performance of 50 hard reps after doing squats and/or stiff-legged deadlifts. Alternating chins and curls, and dips with bench presses every other workout, insures that the major muscular structures of the upper body are being worked fully. I found that I could not squat and deadlift three times per week on this program, but I could complete the upper body movements that often. Again, expect to be sore and somewhat fatigued while using this program, but discontinue it after two to three weeks so that overtraining is avoided. This particular training technique provides very high intensity, low force, low volume muscle stimulating work for the major muscle groups of the body–the exact requisites for encouraging muscular growth and increases in strength. The mental toughness that results from a few weeks of this should not be underestimated nor discounted, and the carryover to more conventional training routines is definite and positive.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Josh T. on Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:18 am

Read some of Leistner's stuff before, but the balls-out approach to training has never worked for me. They're scarily hard looking routines, too.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:54 pm

They're very very tough, kill your recovery and require you to put 100% effort in at every session. They can be fun, though, and teach you how to harness desperation in a unique way. I think so anyway.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sat Jan 26, 2013 4:43 pm

Coupla pics of the york gym:


Grimek.


Schemansky

Grimek again

According to someplace else I saw this picture, the guy doing presses is Ike Berger. He's repping 205, and he weighs in the high 120s.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sat Jan 26, 2013 4:46 pm

CV's posts on the january challenge thread have got me thinking about the oldtimers, haha.

Bill March, who was a big fan of singles and power rack work (and one of the earliest guys to use steroids seriously).


Tommy Kono. Go to 1.05 for a pretty gnarly single layback press.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Josh T. on Sat Jan 26, 2013 6:15 pm

Grimek was a freak. Plain and simple. Reading about some of the stuff he did way back when always blew my mind.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:36 pm

He was super super strong; like 280 press and a nearly 600 squat, or something (some say he did more but there ain't much evidence for that). But some of his random feats are nearly unbelievable, crazy even compared to his 'normal' lifts. Apparently after only a few months of practice he worked his bent press up to well over 300 pounds; and he also did stuff like kneeling power cleans with 270.... How!?

The dittilo/tight tan slacks blog has a lot of grimek and sig klein's memoirs in there and by the sound of it, the york gym fellows got up to some insanely freakish stuff just for fun, on a pretty regular basis.

Anyway, more grimek awesomeness:

^ behind the back snatch


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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:37 pm

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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:48 pm

I've put this up before, but it's funny every time:

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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sun Jan 27, 2013 4:30 pm

Elitefts article on bobsled training:

http://articles.elitefts.com/training-articles/power-on-ice-training-routines-of-the-worlds-best-bobsled-and-skeleton-athletes/
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Sun Jan 27, 2013 4:31 pm

Armwrestlers, janis amolins and arsen liliev fooling around in the gym after a tournament:
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Josh T. on Sun Jan 27, 2013 4:36 pm

Actually thought the bobsled article was very cool. I like to think my training is starting to head more towards the power end of the spectrum as well.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by CheesedogTheFirst on Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:23 am

Josh T. wrote:Grimek was a freak. Plain and simple. Reading about some of the stuff he did way back when always blew my mind.

Grimek could still squat with 300# for reps when he was 80 years old, or so I read. Impressive guy!
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Cesar on Mon Jan 28, 2013 12:26 pm

Journeyman wrote:The "other" ken leistner article:

Fifty-Rep Sets
A very effective means of breaking through boredom or sticking points in training is the 50-rep set. I first began doing this many years ago, and was surprised that I gained so much strength. Most trainees will tell you that endurance will increase doing 50-rep sets, and that is true, but if the 50-rep set is done so that the set ends at a point of momentary muscular fatigue/failure, you will also get strong. It is best to do this for only two to three weeks at a time due to the severity of the program and the difficulty in recovering from it. Choose four to six exercises that provide muscular work for the entire body. Using a barbell, I would do: 1. squats 2. stiff-legged deadlifts while standing on an elevated surface 3. bench presses or dips 4. curls or chin-ups 5. shrugs or upright rows I would take a weight that I thought I could do 20-25 good reps with, perform as many reps as possible, replace the bar on the rack or floor, rest ten seconds, again do as many reps as possible, rest ten seconds, and continue in that manner until 50 repetitions, were completed. In the squat, for example, I would use approximately 275 lbs and do 25-30 reps, put the bar on the rack, take a few deep breaths, take the bar again, gut out 4 or 6 more reps, back away from the rack, take the bar again for 3 or 4 reps, rest perhaps fifteen seconds, and try to finish the set. I never allowed myself to take more than five "rest stops" during the course of the exercise. After squats, I would wait two to three minutes, and then continue with the next exercise. This was brutally hard work, and in the first two workouts, limitations in cardiovascular ability halted me as much as muscular failure. However, I quickly adapted to the program and found that I could develop incredible mental toughness during the actual workout. At that point, when I reached 50 reps, I couldn't do number 51 because I was shaking so badly and could barely direct the working bodypart to function. The key lies in viewing this not as an endurance type workout but as a brutally hard strength training workout.
I don't recommend doing the overhead press because the low back will be too fatigued to allow the performance of 50 hard reps after doing squats and/or stiff-legged deadlifts. Alternating chins and curls, and dips with bench presses every other workout, insures that the major muscular structures of the upper body are being worked fully. I found that I could not squat and deadlift three times per week on this program, but I could complete the upper body movements that often. Again, expect to be sore and somewhat fatigued while using this program, but discontinue it after two to three weeks so that overtraining is avoided. This particular training technique provides very high intensity, low force, low volume muscle stimulating work for the major muscle groups of the body–the exact requisites for encouraging muscular growth and increases in strength. The mental toughness that results from a few weeks of this should not be underestimated nor discounted, and the carryover to more conventional training routines is definite and positive.

This sounds sooo awesome and scary at the same time. Silverback, that's all I gotta say
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Dave on Mon Jan 28, 2013 3:27 pm

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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 28, 2013 3:52 pm

^ What's awesome about that is that it was not his true personal best... he was a few years past his competitive peak there. Also, KAZ is spotting him.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 28, 2013 3:52 pm



The 'other' best 20 rep squat vid on youtube.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:07 pm

Inca Warrior wrote:
Journeyman wrote:The "other" ken leistner article:

Fifty-Rep Sets
A very effective means of breaking through boredom or sticking points in training is the 50-rep set. I first began doing this many years ago, and was surprised that I gained so much strength. Most trainees will tell you that endurance will increase doing 50-rep sets, and that is true, but if the 50-rep set is done so that the set ends at a point of momentary muscular fatigue/failure, you will also get strong. It is best to do this for only two to three weeks at a time due to the severity of the program and the difficulty in recovering from it. Choose four to six exercises that provide muscular work for the entire body. Using a barbell, I would do: 1. squats 2. stiff-legged deadlifts while standing on an elevated surface 3. bench presses or dips 4. curls or chin-ups 5. shrugs or upright rows I would take a weight that I thought I could do 20-25 good reps with, perform as many reps as possible, replace the bar on the rack or floor, rest ten seconds, again do as many reps as possible, rest ten seconds, and continue in that manner until 50 repetitions, were completed. In the squat, for example, I would use approximately 275 lbs and do 25-30 reps, put the bar on the rack, take a few deep breaths, take the bar again, gut out 4 or 6 more reps, back away from the rack, take the bar again for 3 or 4 reps, rest perhaps fifteen seconds, and try to finish the set. I never allowed myself to take more than five "rest stops" during the course of the exercise. After squats, I would wait two to three minutes, and then continue with the next exercise. This was brutally hard work, and in the first two workouts, limitations in cardiovascular ability halted me as much as muscular failure. However, I quickly adapted to the program and found that I could develop incredible mental toughness during the actual workout. At that point, when I reached 50 reps, I couldn't do number 51 because I was shaking so badly and could barely direct the working bodypart to function. The key lies in viewing this not as an endurance type workout but as a brutally hard strength training workout.
I don't recommend doing the overhead press because the low back will be too fatigued to allow the performance of 50 hard reps after doing squats and/or stiff-legged deadlifts. Alternating chins and curls, and dips with bench presses every other workout, insures that the major muscular structures of the upper body are being worked fully. I found that I could not squat and deadlift three times per week on this program, but I could complete the upper body movements that often. Again, expect to be sore and somewhat fatigued while using this program, but discontinue it after two to three weeks so that overtraining is avoided. This particular training technique provides very high intensity, low force, low volume muscle stimulating work for the major muscle groups of the body–the exact requisites for encouraging muscular growth and increases in strength. The mental toughness that results from a few weeks of this should not be underestimated nor discounted, and the carryover to more conventional training routines is definite and positive.

This sounds sooo awesome and scary at the same time. Silverback, that's all I gotta say

The funny thing is that dr ken himself is/was pretty scrawny most of his training life. He was well over 200# at one point, at 5'4'', but I think he eventually dropped back down to the 140-160 range. Brutally strong, though; he could still strict press 220 for several reps at his lighter bodyweight, squat 400x20, and I think in one of those other articles I put up in the other thread he mentioned deadlifting 440x17 at 155.

http://hammproductions.com/www/drken.html

I actually have a copy of the video of him squatting 407x22 as well, it was controversial (some accused him of using fake plates, the weights are silver in color) but I'm inclined to believe it's legit. I could upload it to youtube if y'all want.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:55 am

110kg sots press:

warning-strong language
Spoiler:

Apparently his best strict press is 120kg and he can also push press 150kg x5. So given his shoulder flexibility/stability he has a disproportionately strong sots press compared to the others; still, that is incredibly beastly.


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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Dave on Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:03 am

The guy is quite strong to press that overhead - from a deep squat! Not a big fan of his cameraman's inappropriate use of a great name though...
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Dave on Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:04 am

Journeyman wrote:^ What's awesome about that is that it was not his true personal best... he was a few years past his competitive peak there. Also, KAZ is spotting him.

You think Ole Billy was helping him?
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:54 pm

No I don't think Kaz was helping at all; it's just cool that he was there cheering him on. I have no doubt Kazmeier could have outsquatted platz though, at least until the reps climbed past 30....
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:02 pm



Oh dear. :facepalm:
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:39 pm

So after putting the picture of that really heavy duty squat rack up in SSG's thread I decided to post some more cool pics. These are of zuver's gym which by all accounts was an incredible place to train. Kinda like an oversized playground for strength/powerlifting/odd lifting enthusiasts. Dr Ken wrote a lot about it too, and I've been putting some stuff up about him so I guess it's appropriate.

Leistner.

Inside. Those are custom plates.

Some going pretty darn heavy, 150 pounds apiece....



Fire hydrant for the drinking fountain.

Crane hook for doing weighted dips.

Heavy duty parallel dip bars with a little cart to load the weight on your belt, instead of waddling around before climbing up onto the bars.

Rings, straps, climbing ropes, etc.

Record board. Some strong guys went there, as you can see....

One-ton dumbbell for guys to try and do squat lockouts with

Similar kinda idea for deadlift lockouts

Leistner using something slightly less insane (500#) for partial one hand deadlifts. The little sign on the left lights up and rings if you get it off the ground.

Zuver finding the 'blob'-to-be in a scrapyard.


Young leistner again, lifting a 200 pound water filled barrel with his hands parallel. The gym had a lot of 'challenge' objects like this; if you could lift it with both hands on the bottom like that, you get your name on one of the boards. I think those are industrial gears on an axle in the background, one for shrugs or rack pulls or lockouts or whatever, another for partial squats.


Couple of giant pulldown machines

More weird and oversized stuff: giant phone, key, door, gorilla, etc.




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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:46 pm

Ken Leistner's article on Zuver's gym and the training done there:

Bob Zuver had a very competent collection of lifters who influenced the “way things were done” and of course, was no doubt smart enough to inject the wisdom and ideas that came from the many luminaries who visited his unique establishment. Zuver’s was a magnet for some of the best of the day. There was a general system of training that most of the fellows pursued. 198 pounder Bill Witting and multi-time champion Tom Overholtzer set the squatting standards while many throughout a range of weight classes were recognized as excellent deadlifters. There were a few who benched big but Zuver’s philosophy dictated that “the work necessary to increase the bench press by twenty-five pounds could result in a fifty pound increase in the squat or deadlift,” thus, lots of effort went into those lifts. Remember though, this was Southern California in the ‘60’s and there was still quite a bit of emphasis on exercises that intended or not, certainly resulted in large muscular physiques. If a “general program that everyone used” at Zuver’s could be presented, it would look very much like the following:

Monday: Bench press, dumbbell bench press, dip, squat
Wednesday: Incline press, deadlift, deadlift assistance
Friday: Repeat of Monday’s workout

Dependent upon where one’s bench press was relative to a stated goal or the date of an upcoming contest, the sets and reps would vary. However, as a general rule, the warm-up would consist of a set x 6 reps and one or two sets x 3 reps. If there was “a usual” it would have been 3 sets x 5 reps or 3 sets x 3 reps with the working weight of that day and most often, a back off set x 5-8 reps.

The bench press would be followed by the Dumbbell Bench Press and Reverend Bob had welded short angled racks, long enough to easily and safely hold a pair of his largest dumbbells and the gym dumbbells did go as high as 200 pounders as I recall. The small racks were angled so that one could sit at the end of a flat or incline utility bench, literally hug the heavy dumbbells to one’s chest, and then roll back onto the bench with the dumbbells. This eliminated the often dangerous or energy sapping need to clean the dumbbells to the chest before attempting to lie back in place for the actual bench press movement, or finding spotters who were both strong enough and experienced in handling heavy dumbbells who then had to simultaneously hand the dumbbells off to the lifter. When the set was completed, a spotter could then help the lifter to a seated upright position by merely laying his palms onto the trainee’s upper back and literally flipping him upward. Our group of trainees never had a problem handling dumbbells in the 150 range using this procedure. Most of the powerlifters did 8 sets x 3 reps in the dumbbell bench press though some of the bodybuilders used reps in the 6 to 8 range.

Zuver’s Gym had a twelve foot long dip rack that had what resembled a small railroad flatcar, sans handles, beneath it. The cart was meant to support huge dumbbells that would be worn on a hip belt so that one could add up to a few hundred pounds over bodyweight for the dip exercise. Like the dumbbell bench press, the weighted dips were also done for 8 sets x 3 reps by the powerlifters. The squats that followed the upper body work on Mondays, were done in a similar manner to the bench press regarding sets and reps.
Friday’s workout was similar with adjustments made on the bench press so that the lifter did not overtrain. Squats again would follow the upper body work and the load for full barbell squats would often be lowered to again, avoid overtraining although for some, this would instead be a day of partial squats. In a uniquely designed power rack, a padded bench would snap securely into place over the support pins to allow for bench squats to the desired depth. In another rack, an aircraft bomb hoist, no doubt salvaged from a World War II relic, had been refurbished into workout order and was available to lift huge weights off of pinned lifters doing heavy quarter and one-eighth level squats. On Wednesdays, incline pressing with a barbell was done by almost everyone “on the program” and the sets and reps again mimicked the bench press protocol. This would be followed by Deadlifts which would also follow the same set/rep scheme. The assistance movements done for the deadlift would follow on this day and may have consisted of pulldowns, various rows, and/or shrugs. Curls with both the fixed straight barbells and fixed EZ Curl bars that went from 20 to 200 pounds in five pound increments were done at the discretion of the trainee on any or all of the training days. When I asked Bob, “Who is going to use a 200 pound EZ Curl bar?” I was told that Paul Anderson had been by to visit just the week before our initial appearance at the gym and he in fact did curls with the 200 pound fixed EZ Curl bar. I figured I had used up my quota of stupid questions and listened rather than asked from that point onward!
In retrospect, the typical Zuver’s Hall Of Fame Gym had for most, an overabundance of work that directly affected the deltoids and other pressing-involved musculature. However, we thrived on the program, enjoyed it, and most of the powerlifters at least, followed a very similar routine template.
Like other gyms and training centers of the past and very much unlike today where cookie-cutter facilities exist, Zuver’s had a great atmosphere, fueled by a group of men intent on pushing each other to improvement. The strains of Gospel music playing above the din of the clanging iron, the illuminated signs of spiritual encouragement and quoted scripture added to the unique atmosphere, one that produced many successful lifters.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:55 pm

Couple more pics:




Yeah, I think that would've been an awesome place to train. That press-heavy powerlifting routine outlined above looks pretty solid, too.
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Squat programs:

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:22 pm

Bulking Up --Strength & Health, November 1968. By John McCallum
Years ago, a fool proof method of bulking up was discovered. And yet gaining weight is a
major problem with bodybuilders today because the old method somehow got lost in the
shuffle. It's too bad, because gaining weight is really no problem. Bulking up is far and
away the easiest part of bodybuilding.
If you want to make use of some old gold and really apply yourself, you can gain lots of
weight. If you want to quit scratching around for something new for a couple of months,
you can get as bulky as you want.
Let's review the old method, and then we'll outline a program for you.
We can sum up the essentials very quickly. Squats and milk. That's the gist of it. Heavy
squats and lots of milk and never mind if the principle is years old.
If you're in doubt, let me tell you this. I get scores of letters from lifters around the country
who've tried the squats and milk program. They all say the same thing. They gained more
weight in a month on the squats and milk than they had in a year or more on other types of
programs.Gains of twenty to thirty pounds in a month are not uncommon. If you don't gain
at least ten pounds a month you're doing something wrong.
Lets take it piece by piece. We'll start with the milk bit.
The bodybuilders who don't gain well on milk usually fail because they misunderstand the
instructions to drink a lot of it. I've met a few men who thought a couple glasses was a lot.
That's not what I mean. When I say a lot of milk, I'm talking about a gallon or so a day. A
gallon of milk a day may sound excessive, and perhaps it is, but it's a sure guarantee of fast
gains.
You can even soup up the milk a bit by adding a few items to it; like a day's supply of
protein supplement, some ice cream or maybe some skim milk powder. Either way, just
make sure you drink a gallon a day.
The other essential to the program is the squat. This, like the milk, is often badly
misunderstood. Let's outline a bulking up routine for you, and discuss the squat in it's
proper place in the program.
You should start your program with a brief warmup. Spend about five minutes bending and
twisting, doing light repetition snatches or cleans, sit-ups, running in place, and so on.
Don't wear yourself out on the warmup. Just get your blood moving and a good feeling
about the whole thing.
Your first exercise is the press behind the neck. Do three sets of twelve reps.
Don't be frightened by the relatively high reps, and don't be stampeded into using low rep
stuff. The value of low reps has been greatly exaggerated. Moderately high reps, properly
used, provide umpteen times the growth stimulation, and are so much better for your health
that comparisons become ridiculous.
Do the presses in strict style with a medium width grip. Work hard on them and try to force
the poundage way up. There's no use kidding yourself on this or any other exercise. If you
use baby sized weights, then you can expect baby sized muscles. It's as simple as that and
there's no way out of it.
If you want respectable deltoid, trapezius, and triceps development, then you've got to work
up to about three-quarters of your body weight for the twelve reps. That means around 105
pounds for a 140 pound man, 120 pounds for a 160 pound man, 150 pounds for a 200
pound man, and so on. Nothing less will do. If you think it will, forget it.
The biggest fallacy in weight training is the foisted notion that you can build big powerful
muscles without hard work on heavy weights. You can't do it, brothers, and you're wasting
your time trying. If you're not gaining like you should, give your training poundages a long
hard look. The fault may be entirely yours.
Take a short rest after the presses. The next exercise is the big one, the key to the whole
thing, the squat. You'll do one set of twenty reps, in puff and pant style, with all the weight
you an handle.
Twenty rep squats are the solution to everybody's weight gaining problems. They'll
stimulate growth beyond belief if you work hard enough on them.
Warm up your knees with a few free squats and then start right in on the heavy stuff. Take
three huge gulping breaths between each rep. Hold the last breath and squat. Blast the air out
violently as you come erect.
Hold your head up and keep your back as flat as possible. Don't go below parallel position.
You should use a weight so heavy that the last five reps are doubtful. I continually get
letters from trainees complaining about their slow gains in bodyweight. Eventually I find
out they're using weights in the squat that an old lady with arthritis could lift.
You've gotta force the poundage. 150% of your bodyweight for twenty reps is rock bottom
minimum. That means 300 pounds for a 200 pound man. And remember, that's a minimum
figure. You should figure on going well above that.
As soon as you finish the squats, do twenty pullovers with a light weight. Twenty pounds or
so is plenty. All you want to do is give your rib box a good stretch.
The next exercise is the bench press. This exercise has been published enough so that you
shouldn't need any special instruction on it.
Do three sets in a rather loose style.
The next exercise is bent over rowing. Do three sets of fifteen in very strict style. Rest your
forehead on a block or lean it against a post or something to make sure you don't cheat. Use
a medium width grip and pull the bar to your lower abdomen.
The next exercise is the stiff legged deadlift. One set of fifteen reps. Do the deadlifts
standing on a bench or a high block so that you can go all the way down without the plates
hitting the floor. Concentrate on a full extension and contraction of your lower back.
Don't set the weight down when you finish the fifteen reps. Stand erect and do shoulder
shrugs until you grip gives out. You should be able to get at least a dozen shrugs out of it.
Do another set of light pullovers, twenty reps, after the deadlifts and shrugs.
That completes the program, and it looks like this:
1. Press behind neck 3 x 12
2. Squat 1 x 20
3. Pullover 1 x 20
4. Bench press 3 x 12
5. Rowing 3 x 15
6. Stiff legged deadlift 1 x 15
7. Pullover 1 x 20
Work hard on all the exercises, and work to your limit on the squats. Drink milk as
suggested earlier. Get lots of rest and sleep. Maintain a calm, tranquil mind and start saving
your money. You'll need it to buy bigger clothes.
In other articles, John McCullum stressed the importance of forcing the poundage on the
squat. He said to add five pounds every workout!

More 20-rep squat programs are in the ken leistner thread.
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Smolov squats:

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:34 pm

Original smolov base:
Week Monday Wednesday Friday Saturday
1 70%x9x4 75%x7x5 80%x5x7 85%x3x10
2 (70%+20lbs)x9x4 (75%+20lbs)x7x5 (80%+20lbs)x5x7 (85%+20lbs)x3x10
3 (70%+30lbs)x9x4 (75%+30lbs)x7x5 (80%+30lbs)x5x7 (85%+30lbs)x3x10
4 Rest Rest work up to a near max single work up to a near max single


Altered smolov introductory cycle:

Week 1
Monday 65%x8x3, 70%x5, 75%x2x2, 80%x1
Wednesday 65%x8x3, 70%x5, 75%x2x2, 80%x1
Friday 70%x5x4, 75%x3, 80%x2x2, 90%x1
Week 2
Monday 85%x2x2-3
Wednesday 85%x3x1-2
Friday 85%x5

Altered smolov variant #1: (conservative)
Monday Tuesday Thursday Saturday
Week 1 70%x9x3 75%x7x4 80%x5x5 85%x3x6
Week 2 70%+10kgx9x3 75%+10kgx7x4 80%+10kgx5x5 85%+10kgx3x6
Week 3 70%+15kgx9x3 75%+15kgx7x4 80%+15kgx5x5 85%+15kgx3x6

Altered smolov variant #2: (percentage based)
Monday Tuesday Thursday Saturday
Week 1 70%x9x3 75%x7x4 80%x5x5 85%x3x6
Week 2 75%x9x3 80%x7x4 85%x5x5 90%x3x6
Week 3 77.5%x9x3 82.5%x7x4 87.5%x5x5 92.5%x3x6

Altered smolov variant #3: (more ambitious percentage program)
Monday Tuesday Thursday Saturday
Week 1 70%x9x3 75%x7x4 80%x5x5 85%x3x6
Week 2 75%x9x3 80%x7x4 85%x5x5 90%x3x6
Week 3 80%x9x3 85%x7x4 90%x5x5 95%x3x6

x9x3 = 9 reps, 3 sets; x7x4= 4 sets of 7, etc. etc.

I used the first one for wide stance squats back in 2011. That was the first thing that revealed my hip problem very clearly. I gained 5lb and did experience some squat gains, how much I'm not sure because I didn't finish nor did I max out afterwards... and yeah, the hip issue really jumped out at me, haha.
I used the second one for roundback romanians last semester but just didn't have my recovery worked out properly. Still, I put 20# on my deadlift right after making it only halfway through; and it helped lay a base for the DL gains I had later that semester. (It should be noted, of course, that just about anything makes my deadlift go up.)

Any of the programs can also be done 3 days a week, stretching out into four weeks of actual training after the introduction. These are more conservative than the original smolov but in addition to being more realistic they are perhaps more effective, relying more on total volume to build groove and strength than a 'do or die' grinding approach to put as much muscle on as possible.

-edit-
Sorry if some of these are tough to read, I made them line up in the initial post but apparently this board has formatting issues....




Last edited by Journeyman on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Russian squat routine:

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:39 pm

original russian squat routine
DAY - 1...DAY -2...DAY - 3
Week 1 80% - 6 sets of 2 reps...80% - 6 sets of 3 reps...80% - 6 sets of 2 reps
Week 2 80% - 6 sets of 4 reps...80% - 6 sets of 2 reps...80% - 6 sets of 5 reps
Week 3 80% - 6 sets of 2 reps...80% - 6 sets of 6 reps...80% - 6 sets of 2 reps
Week 4 85% - 5 sets of 5 reps...80% - 6 sets of 2 reps...90% - 4 sets of 4 reps
Week 5 80% - 6 sets of 2 reps...95% - 3 sets of 3 reps...80% - 6 sets of 2 reps
Week 6 100% - 2 sets of 2 reps...80% - 6 sets of 3 reps...105%+ - Max Out Day

The Russian Squat Routine for Masters
Randy Hauer, RKC
The classic six-week Russian Squat Routine is legendary for giving a kick start to the squatter whose progress has stopped. What makes it so effective is the brutal and relentless wave loading of volume for the first three weeks and then an even more brutal wave loading of intensity the final three weeks. Two of the last three workouts are in the 95-105% 1RM range! The original Russian Squat Routine is really designed for younger athletes: men and women at the peak of their athletic and recuperative powers. I’ve done the routine a few times over the years, but as I’ve hit middle age I’ve either had to dial back the baseline 1RM on which I base the routine or cut the routine short. The last time I did the cycle I hit on a formula that allows me to recuperate adequately between sessions and still finish the program with a new 1RM. The original Russian program is a six week program and calls for lifting three days a week on non-consecutive days. My Master’s version is an eight week program and calls for lifting 2 days a week: for example Monday and Thursday, Tuesday and Friday, etc. Allow a minimum of 48 hours between sessions and feel free to take 3 days off after the loading day. But don’t slack…getting old isn’t for sissies and even though this program is modified it isn’t for sissies either…make sure to squat at least two days a week. Here’s how it works. Take your current 1RM and subtract 20% from it. This will be your 1RM for the program. For example, if your best 1RM squat is 150kg, subtract 30kg and your 1RM for the Master’s Russian Squat Routine is 120kg. If you don’t know your 1RM max, I recommend you guess on the low side. Rest as long as you need to between sets. This program is intended for rock bottom Olympic style back squats. If you are a power squatter, subtract 15% from your 1RM to accommodate the difference in depth between the two styles. Belts and wraps are fine either style (we are Masters after all, use what you need to). Feel free to deviate from the written program and take an extra warm-up single or two as you ramp up to the work weights, especially for the loading days of the last three weeks.
Phase 1 - Volume: 4 weeks, squat twice a week Workout 1: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 2: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 3 x 6 sets Workout 3: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 4: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 4 x 6 sets Workout 5: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 6: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 5 x 6 sets Workout 7: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 8: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 6 x 6 sets Phase 2 - Intensity: 4 weeks, squat twice a week Workout 9: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 10: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 85% x 5 x 5 sets Workout 11: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 12: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 90% x 4 x 4 sets Workout 13: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 14: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 95% x 3 x 3 sets Workout 15: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 80% x 2 x 6 sets Workout 16: 60% x 3, 70% x 2, 100% x 1, (105% x 1) (110% x 1) (Attempts in parenthesis are allowed extra PR attempts if the previous attempts were clearly submaximal.) Even in this lightened and more extended format, the Russian Squat routine is a killer. Cut back on the balance of your weight training to give your body all the recuperative energy it needs to come back between workouts. Eat plenty of good food. Listen to your body…this routine is not for everyone. If you start to break down then you should stop and reevaluate for a couple of days.
If you are still game, back up a couple of weeks and take another running start. Ultimately, all routines are suggested guidelines. You have to adapt the routine to how your body responds and as we get older we need to be even more attentive and responsive to our bodies’ warning signals. An eight week program is a suggestion…if you need 9, 10 or 12 weeks to get through this program to a new max, then that is what it takes. If you make it through the routine as written with new maxes: congratulations! Not that you will really want to, but just in case you do I strongly urge you in no uncertain terms do not, I repeat, do not attempt to do this routine back to back or more than twice a year. It is a rough program and the risk of tendonitis and other overuse injuries is high if you try to repeat it. So don’t. Maintain your squatting strength but do it by moving on to another routine. You could, however, apply this program to pressing or some other upper body strength movement. This is acceptable. But your legs and lower back will need a break and something different to do. Trust me. Enjoy the program!
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another Nutter high rep squat program:

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:42 pm

Sarge's insane squatting
A brief history Sarge and I began training together a little more than 3 years ago. At that time his best squat was around 220 pounds. In his first squat workout with me he squatted 135 pounds for 3 sets of 10 repetitions. I'm sure he was sore but he didn't mention it. Sarge rarely comments about post workout soreness. In fact, I don't know if the word 'pain' is in Sarge's vocabulary. Sarge and I are of the opinion that in the gym and in every aspect of life, your gains will be proportionate to the effort you put forth. Nothing inside or outside of the gym is as difficult as high rep squatting. Sarge logically presumes that high rep squatting will bring about the greatest progress because it requires the greatest amount of exertion. For the last three years Sarge has been performing single set, 20 repetition squats once per week for 6 consecutive weeks with 10-12 weeks of low rep, multiple set squatting in between 20 rep squat cycles. When practicing 20 rep squats Sarge lowers his strongman training volume dramatically and drops his overall training volume to just 3 days per week and does not do any cardiovascular training. When he is not practicing 20 rep squats Sarge typically lifts 5 days per week and does high intense cardiovascular training 2 days per week. Sarge performs his 20 rep squats without a belt and uses Ironmind's Buffalo Bar. The following are examples of Sarges typical training routines. 20 rep squat routine Sarge starts week 1 with 110 pounds less than his best ever 20 rep squat. He then adds 20 pounds to the bar every week for 6 weeks. In this manner Sarge exceeds his best 20 rep squat by 10 pounds every time he cycles in this manner. You will notice that Sarge takes three full days off after his 20 rep squat workouts in order to recover from the extreme breakdown of muscle tissue.

Monday- Incline presses and triceps work.
Tuesday - Light power snatches and 20 rep squat
Wednesday - Off
Thursday - Off
Friday - Off
Saturday - Strongman event training

Low rep squat workout Sarge usually implements a simple periodization plan for his squat. Sometimes he uses chains and bands and squats up to 16 sets of 2 reps. When box squatting or when using chains and bands Sarge alternates speed work one week with heavier, lower volume squatting the next. Basically Sarge is always trying different training methods in between 20 rep squat cycles.

Monday- low volume lat pulls, incline dumbbell presses, incline flys, and high volume triceps work.
Tuesday - Power snatches and squatting
Wednesday - High volume pull-ups, chin ups, bent rows and grip work.
Thursday - High volume power cleans, light overhead squats and light front squats.
Friday - Off
Saturday - Very high volume strongman event training.

Update after 3 years
Now that you know how Sarge has been training for the last three years, here's an overview of his gains. He has gone from a bodyweight of 242 pounds at 30% body fat to 218 pounds at 12% body fat. Sarge has increased his best squat with belt only from 220 pounds to 550 pounds. Ironically, though Sarge has only bench pressed two or three times in the last three years, he has made dramatic gains there as well. When Sarge and I started training together the most he could bench press was 285 pounds, though his lifetime best was 330. Sarge recently incline pressed 330 pounds and followed that with a 405 pound flat bench press and claims that it was easy. 12 weeks ago Sarge and I were reminiscing about how much progress he has made. Sarge said, "Remember when I could only squat 220 pounds?!" This prompted me to ask Sarge how many times he thought he could squat 220 pounds with his new squatting abilities. His answer, in typical Sarge fashion was, "Let's find out!" Sarge, being unusually determined and fearless, got up off the couch and started putting his Chuck Taylor's on with the intent of walking out to the gym to see what he could do. I convinced him to delay the attempt long enough to prepare properly with the promise that it would certainly improve his effort. Knowing Sarge the way that I do I am aware that he possesses a rare constitution and will literally and truly push his squat to the absolute total physical limit should the urge come over him to do so. After a day of contemplating the best training approach to such an endeavor, Sarge and I decided to implement what we call Smashed Cat Squats. To properly perform Smashed Cat Squats you must select a weight that is about 50-100 pounds below your best 10 repetition squat and then execute 10 sets of 10 repetitions with that same weight. Attempting a true set of Smashed Cat Squats would be unwise without proper preparation so Sarge began to condition himself with 20 rep squats. In his usual fashion Sarge worked up to 334 pounds for 20 repetitions. He then began box squats with 14 sets of 2 repetitions using 50-75% of his one rep max with 30 seconds rest between sets. The box squats are considered a relaxing, low stress workout. Sarge alternated the box squat workouts each week with 10 sets of 10 squats. The following is Sarge's squat cycle leading up to his max repetition effort with 220 pounds. On the day of the max effort attempt Sarge weighed 218 pounds, so we decided at the last minute to lower the attempt 2 pounds from 220 to 218 so that the weight on the bar would exactly match his own bodyweight.

12 week squat cycle
Week 1- 234x20
Week 2- 254x20
Week 3- 274x20
Week 4- 294x20
Week 5- 314x20
Week 6- 334x20
Week 7- 14x2 box squats
Week 8- 224x10x10
Week 9- 14x2 box squats
Week 10- 244x10x10
Week 11- 14x2 box squats
Week 12- Max effort squat for repetitions with 218 pounds.

The following video is one of the illest, most insane, hardcore demonstrations of human performance that I've ever seen. As you will see, Sarge has improved his best squat from 220x1 three years ago to a psychotic 218x98. Let's face it, you and I don't have the balls to try something like this. But if you want to get a small taste of what it would be like to squat your bodyweight 98 times, just load a bar up, unrack it and just stand there for 10 minutes. Hey, what the heck, maybe some one out there is nuts like Sarge. Send us the video, I'd be honored to host it.

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More squat programs....

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:50 pm

This is one I used for my DL when I first started. 255 to 345 in 14 weeks; it made me discover that
-Any regular, hard training will make my DL go up
-high hips and roundback is the way to go for me
-I can tolerate a very high volume of deadlift and overall back training
-Touch and go reps f##k up my form really badly.

Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4:
4x12, once per week. Start with about 60% and add roughly 3-5% every week, whatever's comfortable. The last reps of the last sets should be really hard.

Weeks 5, 6, 7, 8:
4x8, once per week. Straight weight as before, keep adding 3-5% every weekly session.

Weeks 9, 10, 11, 12:
4x6, same as before.

Weeks 13, 14, 15, 16:
4x3, same as before. Then max out the next week.

If you're built to squat you might be able to pull this off. If you're really crazy, do this once per week (preferably mondays, when you're fresh, and this is all you do on that day) and max on front squats on one other day each week. I did deadlifts followed by cheat curls and weighted dips on mondays and maxed on hack lifts thursdays or fridays on most weeks.
I will do this program again someday, you get out of it exactly what you put in; as long as you're smart and conservative with the weight you add, and you're built to do the lift in question. Thus, Josh or SSG might be able to try this for the squat. Dave or Matt probably would not.

Jeff Steinberg on weekly doubles for the squat:
My training life has gone through several phrases, all of which were effective to some extent. Lately, my training has reverted back to a model that integrates the best features from a couple of those phases. I've combined the HIT/Hardgainer training frequency, with a more "progressive" Pavel Tsatsouline-type volume-building set and rep approach. Squatting once per week, I use the same working weight every week and strive to do one more double every week. The training requires patience and restraint, but it really is quite simple. It's not that difficult to add a double every week, but by the end of a 2 month training cycle, I've gone from doing 2x2 with a moderately heavy weight to 10-12x2 with that same weight--something I could not do at the beginning of the cycle. And, once my volume is high enough with a given weight, increasing the weight by 30 pounds and dropping back to 2x2 isn't that difficult either. Finally, as opposed to combining the reps into a single high-rep set, it is not that difficult for me to recover from a once weekly session of multiple doubles. Hence, it is a slow, but "easy" way to gain strength. Point of interest: I like to supplement the squatting with some hamstring work to balance out the knees. In the past, I've used band good mornings for high-reps, kettlebell swings, natural glute-ham raises, or my personal preference, stiff-leg deadlifts done from either the floor or standing on a box. Whichever exercise I choose, I usually only do ~2 moderate sets after I've finished squatting. My results Tthe first time I used this training model I went from doing 300x2x2 to 300x12x2, dropped back to 325x3x2, and increased to 325x12x2. At this point, I easily squatted my previous 1RM on a whim, 1 day after a volume training day, at the end of a 2 hour grappling session, after doing 2x2 pistols on each leg with 100 lbs additional weight. I consider repeating my former best effort under significantly worsened conditions to be progress. The weight was 425, done in a smooth, deep, upright high-bar style. This is my second time using the training model. Over a period of 8 weeks, I increased from 355x2x2 to 355x10x2. A couple of those weeks I squatted 405x2 on a second squat day. I went out of town before getting to test a heavy lift, but since getting back, I've made the jump to 385, restarting at 2x2. The weight felt a bit heavy, but a day later I'm not sore. I expect to be able to start building volume with this weight.


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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:54 pm

...And, that's about it. Two 20-rep squat program variants, with more in the other thread; two RSR variants, four smolov variants, a linear cycle and an autoregged cycle each to be done once per week. Should be enough to hold y'all's interest and provide some food for thought for a while, where squatting's concerned ;)

There are plenty more good squat programs out there; a program based on percentages, lots of frequency and volume, and not as much intensity is probably better for lanky guys who aren't built to squat. Lots of volume and intensity ("HARD WORK") but not as much frequency for 'practice' seems to better suit guys who are actually built to squat.

-edit-
Forgot some more gold. This one is really interesting. Very 'pure' in terms of strength training for a 1RM--heavy singles, isometrics, rack work. These are from john mckean, who squatted mid-500s regularly @ 148-165 drug free. Strong deadlifter too and liked the odd lifts.

I never worked box squats much, preferring to start a squat from dead stop on a low rack pin. I got a huge clue on this from talking to fellow Pittsburgher , the late, great Olympian Russ Knipp. Russ did what he called 2/3 squats -he'd squat from a rack pin just a hair above parallel (I think his "2/3" term was because it wasn't quite a legal "full" low squat -though actually lower than what is passed today in some power meets!!) and lift from the dead stop on up. Knipp reasoned the big poundages made any normal squat below parallel fairly easy! With his "thunder thighs" and amazing power, it obviously worked well for him (if he'd ever entered a power meet at 165, I never would’ve got any local squat records, nor would anyone else!!!)
I used Russ's 2/3 rack squat to set one of my early squat records with 505. Funny thing -at that meet, a guy in a heavier weight class was going for 505 also, and was reported to be training with 600# in a "negative only" style. Admittedly he controlled the weight and sunk down way better than I did, with my positive only training: trouble was, he couldn't get back up! I came up with power to spare, and got my white lights!!
I just singled up in DLs, but usually as an afterthought after squats. In fact to shorten up, one time I only did one set of 4 in DL, due to extra work on heavy squats (was training for a record),at the tail end of the workout. Started medium, added 5# per workout and finished that cycle with 485 for 4. Didn't get to test the limit then, but my best DL in competition was 530. I think the all-round forms of deadlifts were better suited to me and did a 2 barbell dl of 441 (at 62 years old) and a one hand DL of 369 (while weighing 142#). All singles in training these.
documented my training after dropping down to the 148 pound class. Using rack work at that time I went from an official (judged strictly in those days) competition squat ( no drugs, no multi-ply suit) of 450, up to 530 within months. At different stages during this period I rack squatted 585 just above parallel, 530 at parallel; and 445 three inches below. Now each of these positions was up to higher pins, surrounded by thick Styrofoam, so I could PUSH (rather than merely hold) into something that was giving enough to encourage supreme effort at the top. After that cycle, when I'd squat from the pin all the way up I did more weight over the years, but can't remember exactly how high I got. They sure made regular squatting easy, though. I had about a 6" range of movement between the bottom pin and the Styrofoam. I had the same problem originally that you mentioned - those dang pins clanged like crazy and it was disheartening to push into hard steel that was a true and brutal deadstop. So I searched around my messy garage and
found old boat bumpers which already had a center hole. I slid the rack pin thru them and had a very comfortable top position to push into. There still wasn't much give (especially with 500+# already on your back) but I'd imagine I was squishing those bumpers just 1/8" more thru the duration of the "hold". After these "bumper holds" I rarely had problems with sticking points in the competition squats!
Now, to be fair, I did often go through a few quick singles with the regular squat (such as 135,225,315,405,455,495 - just ONE each!!), then move to the rack position of the day. If that rack push & hold didn't FINISH me, I sure wasn't using enough weight! If, however, the usual 5# increase from the previous workout did not really challenge (sometimes the gains between workouts on these rack pushes was unreal!) I'd do my "one and a halfs"- I'd do the 6 second hold, then sink back to just above the bottom pin, pause for 2 or 3 seconds, then try to push to the top and hold for another few second (really pushing into giving bumpers rather than a "hold").
That 600 # squat (at 165) was sort of a "fluke" and I only did it once in training (unlike my singles with 500, which I conservatively estimate I did well over 2000 times in my training!). But I was working on my master's degree at college, away from home in the summer months. I had no real training facilities, so set up a pair of steel pipes with two chains between them for PURE isometric squats (always around the parallel position, but different each day, because I never measured). I did usually 2 positions for a gut busting 6-8 seconds hold each. Then, home for the weekend, I'd single up to a top weight on Saturday. One day, everything just felt easy -I hit 515, 560, 585, and then the 600. No, not an official contest lift, so I really don't count it....
At 148, I'd single up in squats with 135,225,315, 404,455,495,515 and then do "speed squats" with 75% (385) for 3 singles. I'd try to add 5# each workout. These days I'd do the speed singles with one medium band over the bar. I'd work the squat & bench in this manner on Mon & Fri, the deadlift and close grip bench on Wed.

Something to keep in mind is that unlike the other squat programs/cycles I listed, this is not a quick fix or a 6 week program r a 12 week cycle, mckean did near max singles and heavy isometrics or deadstop rep variants once or twice a week for something like 20 years. This is the exact opposite of ken leistner's philosophy of 'build strength with moderate to high reps, to demonstrate strength with low reps'. McKean's idea is 'build strength with low reps by demonstrating strength with low reps' i.e. maxing out often and using that, as well as supermaximal isometrics, to build strength for competition.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

Post by Josh T. on Thu Jan 31, 2013 8:47 pm

Good lord that's a lot of stuff. Thanks for all the info man - seen a number of them before, but a number of them are also new to me.
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Re: Just cool stuffs

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