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From a rough and rugged foundation

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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Journeyman on Wed Jan 20, 2016 2:34 am

That is a pretty slick little EDC blade Dave, nice work! Profile reminds me of the smaller esee (izula/candiru) models.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Wed Jan 20, 2016 11:23 pm

Thanks a lot Jman!  I was quite happy with how it turned out.  It's on loan to a friend right now.  Since you mention it Esee, I have been eyeing the 3 or the Izula as a possible addition to my EDC rotation, but can't really justify the cost right now.

Anyway, I did not end up doing L-sit towel pullups and HeSPUs last night, but instead played with the 48 kg bell. At work now, will train tonight.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Cesar on Thu Jan 21, 2016 12:02 am

48kg...I am having a hard enough time with my 36kg
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 21, 2016 12:56 am

Yeah there are lots of nice blades out there, but always the cost....

I have a delica and use it for everything, suits my purposes just fine and I'm very happy with it. I want a native 5 or caly 3 at some point but it'd be a splurge.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Thu Jan 21, 2016 1:28 am

The native is a really nice looking blade, sort of like a sleeker version of the Manix (of which I have the 2 XL variety, but reprofiled the spine to look like the Para2).  I like the back lock a bit better than the ball bearing lock, I think, especially after making a personally modded Recon 1 my main EDC for the last 3 or 4 months.  Best (for me) knife I have ever owned, period.

I gave my brother a purple delica and set him up with a worksharp and a sharp maker.  He told me that before he ever had to sharpen the delica, he used it for a few things here and there - including cutting up his children's old, no longer needed potty to put in the recycling.  The plastic on that thing was pretty thick and rigid.  He said the delica carved it up like butter and shaved hair off his arm after.  My collection includes a tan endura, which I carry from time to time.  It is a pocket laser.  :love:  The delica is a slightly smaller version of the endura, and an excellent choice!  :up:

Why the Caly 3?  Do you like the look?  I personally find the look unappealing.

Cesar wrote:48kg...I am having a hard enough time with my 36kg

Don't get me wrong, it's not exactly an easy thing to move around!  I have yet to do anything for more than a single, except two hand swings.  But the T-handle is maybe half the diameter of the KB for grip though, which means even heavier T-handle swings will be easier for me, at least right now.

Thought this was cool:

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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Journeyman on Thu Jan 21, 2016 2:14 am

Yeah I'd prefer the native to the manix just because of the lockback... never played with a ball bearing lock though. And I'd think of the native or caly as a delica upgrade mainly due to their having a true choil, imo the one imperfection in the delica (and I do really like the look of the caly personally). The endura would be a bit too big for my mostly indoor tasks.

...Ollie's a strong dude. Bodybuilding and military training background.
One of just a few things my gym lacks is true monster bells, I wish we had at least a 56 and 64/68.



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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sat Jan 23, 2016 10:12 pm

Okay, so I have been slacking on the superset, but working a lot on knives and getting a lot of sharpening requests that take up my time as well. I have been playing a wee bit with the 48 kg, but not a lot a lot.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Sun Jan 24, 2016 6:48 pm

Dave wrote:Okay so I windmilled it on the right, and failed on the left.  Not an epic fail, but if I pushed any farther it would have been.  I just caught it with my other hand and set it back down like a good boy.  Oh and I C&Jed it another few times today, GTG style.   Fun!

And I just emailed Ciampa for his manual.  Thanks for the suggestion Chris and Aris.

Update pending on my January challenge work for today.

There's some good tips on TGU and Swings, which I wish I had when I started.  Will definitely be working some of his crawling progressions into my training at some stage to sort out some structure and posture issues...

Nice work with the 48 Dave, looking forward to your TGU, can't imagine having that much weight over head  :mrgreen:  .I've been working some mobility Getups into my warm ups which are work well.

Awsome blades, your really honing your skills :D
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Journeyman on Sun Jan 24, 2016 8:08 pm

Mobility getups are great.

The 48 isn't actually that big of a deal to TGU, unless you're on the smaller side. Just have to have good technique and patience and decent shoulder stability.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Sun Jan 24, 2016 9:00 pm

Journeyman wrote:Mobility getups are great.

The 48 isn't actually that big of a deal to TGU, unless you're on the smaller side. Just have to have good technique and patience and decent shoulder stability.

Yep on the smaller side and compared to the 20 Kg I'm working at the moment.  Getting there with the technique, still working on the patience and shoulder stability.  

Finish the mobility Getups with an arm bar at 90 degrees to the body, great stretch on the shoulders, but very ugly to get out of again! Similar to how Al finishes, but shuffle the arm out to the side.

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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Journeyman on Sun Jan 24, 2016 9:27 pm

If you're talking about adding a bent armbar (bringing the elbow down to meet the lat) that's a great idea and I like adding that too.

YMMV but mobility getups are designed to be done light. I was talking to him about this actually and praising the idea of separating the 'strength' from the 'mobility' variations of TGU. For mobility getups I'll never go more than 12-16kg generally even though I generally use the 32kg for a few singles in the normal TGU just as part of my general warmup.

To work up to the 48kg you'll definitely need at least a 28, 32/36, and 40kg. Or you could strap bells together (a lighter bell hanging off of a heavier one). With your HSPU strength it shouldn't take long to get there.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Mon Jan 25, 2016 9:57 am

Journeyman wrote:If you're talking about adding a bent armbar (bringing the elbow down to meet the lat) that's a great idea and I like adding that too.

No, instead of the arm on the ground ( left) pointing inline with the body, I slide it out to the side (90 degrees and palm down) and with chest and hips turned flat to the ground, head turned towards the right KB arm held vertical overhead.  Opens  the chest and feel the stretch through the shoulder on the ground as well as the stretch through the shoulder holding the bell.  Trying to push the chest & hips to the ground forces the KB arm to push back further to stay vertical and intensifies the stretch through both shoulders.  If any of that makes sense??  

Journeyman wrote:To work up to the 48kg you'll definitely need at least a 28, 32/36, and 40kg. Or you could strap bells together (a lighter bell hanging off of a heavier one). With your HSPU strength it shouldn't take long to get  
Cheers!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Thu Jan 28, 2016 2:23 am

My sleep and schedule have both been too erratic to support structured training lately.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by ccheatum on Fri Jan 29, 2016 8:42 am

So, any unstructured training? You know doing something will probably help with your sleep patterns.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sat Jan 30, 2016 4:13 am

Yes, some.  Every day I stretch and squat and perform some kind of movement snack or snacks, and I continually monitor my ability to explode out of low stances, and infrequently work plyos like squat hops or one legged squat hops.  I still feel like I am on a gradual increase in overall physical ability.  Knuckles on wood.  Been practicing Filipino heaven and earth drill.  Mostly heaven.  My coworker, who was privately coached through Kali drills by an expert says my elbows flare too much, but I don't think I have the specific flexibility to perform the movement smoothly.  Maybe it's getting better?  Time will tell.  We sometimes practice with empty plastic bottles, I made a couple foam training knives, but they might look a little menacing to bring in to work for that!   :laugh1:

I realized February 10 is Ash Wednesday, so I'm also mentally preparing for low power mode due to fasting.  Despite that, I did some descending sets of cleans with the 48 tonight, which left me dripping and hungry. But, if anything can kick me into higher productivity and discipline, it's a good 40 days of austerity. If what's good for the goose is good for the gander, what's good for the soul, is good for everything.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Cesar on Sat Jan 30, 2016 12:00 pm

Gonna have to start working with my 36kg. I have found tgus are not solid for me. Need to put in the work.
You say you modified your recon? I would like to see that. And your other knives. Show and tell, lol.

Getting in some snacks and getting off routine can help recharge you. Good luck with it.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sat Jan 30, 2016 2:44 pm

Thanks  Cesar!

Cesar wrote:You say you modified your recon? I would like to see that. And your other knives. Show and tell, lol.

Working soon, but I have time to show and tell the Recon 1 XL Tanto right now.

Show (top pic is from the web, bottom pic is out of my pocket, just moments ago):

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Tell:

Changes I made include cutting the blade down to a wharncliffe, from a tanto, adding a "wave" style opener, shortened the handle to accommodate the shorter blade, adding two additional choils to it, threading the G10 further up the handle so I could reattach the pocket clip, and swapping out the Cold Steel standard pocket clip for a titanium deep carry pocket clip.

Also, you may notice from from the pics that the first 1/8 or so of the blade was originally not sharpened, and was covered by the DLC coating; I painstakingly sharpened that section of the blade with small handheld diamond files, before polishing it up on the belt sander.  You may also notice the bevels are wider on my modded knife, because I also reprofiled the edge from about 20 degrees per side to 12 dps, with a 15 degree microbevel.  This thing cuts like a laser and arm hairs pop off without resistance.  The blade was 5 1/2", is now 3 7/8"; it is about the biggest knife I would want to carry in the city, and I do carry it often.  I opted out of a "tactically pointy" tip, as I do not carry a knife for self defense, but for utility tasks and food prep.

Changes you cannot see include disassembling the knife so I could grind and polish the tang for smoother opening and closing.  The triad lock still locks up like a bank vault, but I no longer need to push the lock bar as far to disengage it, and can easily open and close the knife one handed.

The price for the original knife was about $220 CAD shipped, but I would not part with this knife for anything less than $350 CAD now, due to the amount of work that went into it, and the fact it is now, and so far, the most perfect pocket knife I have ever used.  I would never try to sell it, actually, and if someone did make me an offer, I would buy another one in a heartbeat and remake it all over again.  The only reason I bought it in the first place, was so I could mod it exactly as you see above.

It cuts paper, cardboard and plastic all day and all week or month without needing sharpening.  I've hacked ~1/2 pine branches off with it and was still able to shave hair with it afterwards.  CTS-XHP steel is pretty awesome, as stainless goes.  Almost my favourite of all the knife steels I have owned and used (in order from least to most liked by me: 440A, 440B, 440C, 5Cr15MoV, 8Cr13MoV, AUS-8A, Damascus 1095/14N20, 9Cr14MoV, CTS-BD1, 1055, 1095, VG1, VG10, CPM-S30V, CTS-XHP, SR-101).

Wharncliffes are, in my opinion, the best general purpose EDC blade shape one can ask for, except for possibly a delica/endura style blade shape, which could be called a "modified wharncliffe", adding a very slight amount of belly.

Almost forgot to mention, a Polar FT7 HR monitor has been ordered.  :mrgreen:
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Cesar on Sat Jan 30, 2016 7:22 pm

Excellent and extensive show and tell. Wow! I wish I had the skill to do something like that. I need to learn as I have plenty of pocket knife and worry about them becoming dull and how much to pay to sharpen.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:12 am

Well thanks for asking!  A craftsman always loves to talk about his passion.   :)   Sharpening is actually a lot simpler than most people fathom.  The astute autodidact can only become a master sharpener once he knows and understands the below process:

Profile a dull edge using coarse abrasives first, keeping a consistent angle.  Look at the edge as you remove material and make sure you are bringing it to an apex.  An apex is only properly achieved once you have a burr that runs along the entire length of the blade.  Until this happens, it is a mistake to change to a finer grit.  A blade that has worn unevenly needs to be selectively ground only in the spots that are not yet at an apex.  Once the apex is achieved along the whole edge, sharpening is done, but you will have a coarse, microscopically toothy edge.  Like a saw.  To turn it into a scalpel, you must hone the edge, that is to say, polish the edge by using the same process as sharpening, but with finer and finer abrasives along the profile you have already created.  Stick with each abrasive long enough to polish away the coarser scratch pattern from the abrasive before.  This reduces friction and drag, increasing cutting efficiency and perceived sharpness, not to mention extends the useful life of the edge.  Strop once you are done.  Your edge will now be very smooth and shiny; it will be the envy of anyone who appreciates sharp tools, and will seem to literally scare the hairs off your arm. :affraid:

Sharpening methods are many, so look at the market and decide how you want to do it. I do it for money, so I want to be able to reprofile edges fast, hence the belt sander. Best one I can recommend, the set up I use, is a work sharp with the blade grinding attachment. Both pieces of kit will run you a few hundred bucks all in, if you include some extra belts. Reprofiling could also be done with the sandpaper and mousepad method, especially if it is diamond sandpaper. Even regular hardware store sandpaper will work. This is going to be much slower and take significantly more skill and concentration. It is fun and very rewarding to make a razor sharp edge like this. The spyderco sharpmaker is great, but is definitely not for reprofiling. I use it to set a microbevel and to maintain my already sharp (apexed) knives after use. In the end, though, if you are not able to spend the time and money on really developing your sharpening skills, just buy a couple anysharps, and your knives will be sharp enough. Don't tell any of my sharpening clients about this though.


Last edited by Dave on Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:32 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:25 am

Dave wrote:Well thanks for asking!  A craftsman always loves to talk about his passion.   :)   Sharpening is actually a lot simpler than most people fathom.  The astute autodidact can only become a master sharpener once he knows and understands the below process.
Simple, but I'm sure the skill would take years to fully master.  

Good to  see youve ordered an FT7.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:52 am

Rastaman wrote:Simple, but I'm sure the skill would take years to fully master.

Fully master? I doubt such a thing exists! But lots of practice is certainly required to reach any degree of mastery. I don't call myself a master, but I let my edges speak for themselves.

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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:57 am

Wow, awsome vid.  Now thats sharp!

Your right, your edges speak for themselves.

How many hours go into getting your blades that sharp?
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sun Jan 31, 2016 3:04 am

Thank you for the kind words Chris!  As to your question, it depends on the state of the knife, but I should be able to do a dozen knives of that size in an hour, as long as they are not chewed right up to begin with.  And now my leg is cold. :laugh1:
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Sun Jan 31, 2016 3:10 am

Dave wrote: And now my leg is cold. :laugh1:
Beats waxing...or so I've heard.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sun Jan 31, 2016 3:16 am

Rastaman wrote:Beats waxing...

I'm sure it's less painful!

or so I've heard

Riiiiight...  ;)
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Sun Jan 31, 2016 3:20 am

Touch'e....
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Cesar on Sun Jan 31, 2016 6:46 pm

Wow! That's impressive. I will have to find a way to get my knives to you or learn how to get them that super sharp. Amazing
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by ccheatum on Mon Feb 01, 2016 11:39 pm

Dave, impressive work on the knife, and that edge is awesome!

A while back, you posted pics of your first knife in the Deep Thoughts section. It looked like this,


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I am interested in the top one. What blade shape is that, and how much would a knife like that cost to buy?

Your work is beautiful, and your edges are amazingly sharp. You have a lot to be proud of!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Tue Feb 02, 2016 1:53 am

Thanks Chris!

The blade shape on these knives above straddles the lines between wharncliffe and sheepsfoot style blades.  The pointier it is, the more likely it is to be called wharncliffe.  A thin wharncliffe blade is great at penetrating, but very weak.  A broader and shorter one is stronger and great for utility tasks, still has great tip precision, and it easier on the wrist for longer tasks than a more upswept point.

These two have been practice knives for me as I have never been truly and fully happy with them, and am not in love with the Damascus steel's performance (it performs well enough, it just doesn't wow) and please make no mistake, the astounding sharpness and edge holding of the knife in the video is quite beyond that of the knives I am making. I don't have equipment to easily shape large quantities steel billed as of super steels.

Edge holding performance on the stainless blades I use, on the other hand, is so far much better than the Damascus from what I have seen so far, and is on par with most production knives.  It even threatens some some of my Spydercos.  Since I do not grind my own blades, for lack of space and equipment, so I use blanks from a trusted manufacturer who mass produces in value steel.  For example, that Tanto I posted, made in the stainless 9Cr14MoV steel fromthe same people, when sharpened to 18 dps with a 20 degree microbevel, slices paper for some time and only seems to need to be stropped periodically to wipe the fibers from the blade.  It will quickly lose its hair shaving edge here, but that edge is not a realistic working edge in the field unless you are talking about much more expensive steels.  Even when it begins to catch on paper despite stropping, it still goes through cardboard with relative ease.  Definitely a performer.


Also, Damascus would not fare too well at sea, as it is high in carbon and prone to rust. So I still would like to encourage you wait for a stainless knife you can wear at work (if that's what you're looking for?).

You should know it looks different now and is again in an unfinished state.  A hot vinegar bath will put on a tinny grey and black contrast finish and somewhat protect against rust, but this knife would not do well at sea regardless.  Just need to put that out there for you Chris.  Otherwise, I have tightened everything up on it.  I have continued to work on a smoother grind line as well, for better slicing efficiency, as well as shorten and broaden the tip for greater strength.  Sheath is unfinished.  Will get more holes and some rivets, but probably be remade altogether.  Two layers of tape on the blade next time during molding. Live and learn.  I still need to build a jig to make belt clips.



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EDIT:

So just to clarify, yes I can make my knives do what the one in the video did, but they will have to do it at a higher edge angle (like 18 - 23 degrees per side) rather than 12 dps, and will still likely degrade in performance sooner than such a hard and clean steel as XHP.  But they will be tougher to resist impact than the harder super wear resistant steels.

The second knife doesn't even look like itself anymore.

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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Tue Feb 02, 2016 2:13 am

And I took the 100 lb kettlebell out for a play on the street this evening.  Some cleans and clean and jerks as well as bent press bottom position, or windmills with a bent arm.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Cesar on Tue Feb 02, 2016 6:00 am

You at super passionate about knife making. I believe you will go a long way and be very successful, Dave. Don't lose the spirit and stay true to your self and the art. Keep up the good work.

100lbs kb? Wow!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Tue Feb 02, 2016 2:53 pm

Thanks Cesar!  And yeah the ~105 lb /48 kg bell.  I figure the more I play with it the lighter it will be.  I can clean it for reps now and am getting more comfortable carrying it around.  It does not intimidate me like it did at first any more.  :)


Last edited by Dave on Wed Feb 03, 2016 4:55 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : my business images should remain unpublished for now)
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Wed Feb 03, 2016 8:08 pm

I discovered today that I can now close the heavy grips 300 compeltely on my right hand. Never done it before, and I was just farting around with them at work here and the 200 felt like nothing and 250 felt very easy, easier than ever before. Doing sets of 3-5 has been tough with it and I often reach(ed) failure before I could close it for that many reps. Well this time it was crush, crush, crush, rep after rep. Then I got a call so put them down and grabbed the 300 later and before I knew it, I had closed it all the way. Very close on the left hand. I blame the 10+ sessions of towel L-sit pullups and the cleans with the heavy kettlebell. Now I want a bigger kettlebell. And a smaller one. :loopy:
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Wed Feb 03, 2016 9:13 pm

Solid work Dave,  you'll be owning the beast in no time!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Cesar on Wed Feb 03, 2016 10:21 pm

Excellent news and great Dave!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Wed Feb 10, 2016 9:09 pm

I can now windmill to full ROM on both sides with the 48 kg bell.

Sitting up with it is pretty hard, haven't done it yet, so I will be working on reverse TGUs over the next little while.  GTG style during lent, which starts today, Ash Wednesday, because I am on a mostly liquid diet.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Wed Feb 10, 2016 11:33 pm

Nice work Dave.  Good idea on the reverse TGU's.  Read somewhere on Strong First that working multiple reps each side with the 40 kg helps bridge the gap to the Beast.  Working up to 2-3 reps on each side, i.e L 1,1,1 R 1,1,1  and really focusing on driving the heel through the ground during the the roll up onto elbow with the 48.

Just remember that this is coming from someone who is only playing with a 20kg  at the moment  :mrgreen:  I'm sure you know whats needed.

My Daughter came home from school yesterday and made the statement out of the blue that she will be giving up sausages for Lent... and she loves sausages lol!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Fri Feb 12, 2016 2:38 pm

Rastaman wrote:Nice work Dave.  Good idea on the reverse TGU's.  Read somewhere on Strong First that working multiple reps each side with the 40 kg helps bridge the gap to the Beast.  Working up to 2-3 reps on each side, i.e L 1,1,1 R 1,1,1  and really focusing on driving the heel through the ground during the the roll up onto elbow with the 48.

Sounds like great advice! I am also performing extreme ROM alternating windmills with a 10 pound plate in each hand for high reps, bending down as low as I can go and reaching as far as I can behind me with the other hand. I find it helps me get a stretch deep in my core muscles that I feel would be too dangerous for me to go for with heavier weights.

My Daughter came home from school yesterday and made the statement out of the blue that she will be giving up sausages for Lent... and she loves sausages lol!

Awesome! The path of self sacrifice can be challenging but rewarding.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rix on Sat Feb 13, 2016 4:52 pm

A 48kg kettlebell would scare the poop outta me. My double 32's are hard enough
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Tue Feb 16, 2016 2:54 pm

Naw, you can handle it. Double 32s would be more challenging than a single 48, I'd wager.

Today's workout burned a "whopping" 70 Calories, saw my heart rate spike to 150 and included a number of clean and jerks and windmills (all singles) with the 48 kg.  I also managed some fairly easy alternating one handed swings.  My crush grip is getting a whole lot stronger.  I am going to be snatching the beast quite soon, I think, if progress continues at this pace.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Elethor on Tue Feb 16, 2016 4:21 pm

I saw heavy grips. What kind are you using ? Sounds like a fun thing to add on to my things to acquire. Alongside a bunch of kettlebells of course.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Wed Feb 17, 2016 1:00 am

I bought the full set of Heavy Grips grippers a few years ago. They are great. A buddy at work whom I lent them for part of his shift really like them and ordered himself a 150, 200, and 250. He is going to bring them in so I can test them alongside mine to see how much mine have seasoned. They are fun. I could close the 200 as soon as I got them and the 250 was not far behind. But I never really felt like I progressed much with them, at least not as a direct result of using them. That said, my forearms always got a great pump from the grippers. But it has taken me like half a decade or so to close the 300. I always felt stronger on the grippers after some other kind of grip work, though, and now especially after even minimal training with the big kettlebell. I'm sure it doesn't hurt that the grip on my kettlebell is probably about twice as thick as it needs to be!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Elethor on Wed Feb 17, 2016 2:37 am

Are you using the captain crush grippers then dave ? Sounds like I should look into it f or testing myself more than anything else. ;D
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Wed Feb 17, 2016 3:42 am

No these ones: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Elethor on Wed Feb 17, 2016 4:01 pm

Well they look totally amazing. Now I'll try floating the idea that I want them and see if anyone buys me them as a birthday present.
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rix on Wed Feb 17, 2016 6:30 pm

Watched a good video with mahler explaining the heavy single kb snatch. Might interest you dave. Snatch that 48kg bell ;)

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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sat Feb 20, 2016 2:56 am

You've got it my friend!



Was pretty hungry after this.  But I am forbidden to eat until after noon Saturday (Lenten fast).  Thank God for milk!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rastaman on Sat Feb 20, 2016 3:29 am

Awesome Dave !!!

I'm hungry just watching!
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Rix on Sat Feb 20, 2016 5:52 am

Dave that was beasty
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

Post by Dave on Sun Feb 21, 2016 10:50 pm

I know my form needs work, but these workouts leave me feeling awesome
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Re: From a rough and rugged foundation

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